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Last Post...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:11 pm
 
On Nov 11, 9:58 pm, Sir Frederick Martin <mmcne... at (no spam) fuzzysys.com>
wrote:
[quote]On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:05:40 -0800 (PST), Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end.
[/quote]
ø Every 20 or 30 years somebody comes up with
a doomsday prediction, usually unsupported
by facts

[quote]Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors.
[/quote]
ø Not_at_all true!!

—— ——
There are three types of people that you
can_not_talk_into_behaving_well. The
stupid, the religious fanatic, and the evil.

1- The stupid aren't smart enough to follow the
logic of what you say. You have to tell them
what is right in very simple terms. If they do
not agree, you will never be able to change
their mind.

2- The religious fanatic: If what you say goes
against their religious belief, they will cling to
that belief even if it means their death.

3- There is no way to reform evil- not in a
million years. There is no way to convince

anthropogenic_global_warming_alarmists,

terrorists, serial killers, paedophiles, and

predators to change their evil ways, They
knew what they were doing was wrong, but
knowledge didn't stop them. It only made
them more careful in how they went about
performing their evil deeds.
 
Immortalist...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:18 pm
 
On Nov 12, 9:11 pm, Last Post <last_p... at (no spam) primus.ca> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 9:58 pm, Sir Frederick Martin <mmcne... at (no spam) fuzzysys.com
wrote:

Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors.

ø Not_at_all true!!

[/quote]
....it is estimated that 99.9% of all species that have ever existed
are now extinct.[2][3]

[2] a b c Newman, Mark. "A Mathematical Model for Mass Extinction".
Cornell University. May 20, 1994. URL accessed July 30, 2006.

[3] a b Raup, David M. Extinction: Bad Genes or Bad Luck? W.W. Norton
and Company. New York. 1991. pp.3-6 ISBN 978-0-393-30927-0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extinction

When you claim that it is not at all true, are you saying that you are
ready to refute these claims or give alternative evidence that
competes with these existing theories?
 
Sir Frederick Martin...
Posted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 2:35 am
 
On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 14:54:02 -0800 (PST), tooly <rdh11 at (no spam) bellsouth.net> wrote:

[quote]On Nov 11, 9:58 pm, Sir Frederick Martin <mmcne... at (no spam) fuzzysys.com
wrote:

Another, similar to 20, is the recognition that the canonic common
folk talk models of what it is and means to be human, are incorrect.
Correcting those, will cast revolution at minimum, probably not destruction.
This may be a basis for fearing science, it is also the most likely.

Those models worked well when 'we' were in hunter-gatherer mode,
the context and times have changed.

Immort covered this on number 19.
[/quote]
That's not the same.
 
Peter Baeder...
Posted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 7:29 am
 
On Nov 12, 10:49 pm, Ed <edga... at (no spam) att.net> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 9:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:



We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

 -21 We get out-competed for essential resources by another species.

Only hubris kept this off the list; we can't imagine that we aren't
the be-all and end-all of species.
[/quote]
Oh C'mon! Homo Sapiens have only been around for 50,000 years!

We're not close to being successful as the Dinosaurs. They lasted
for hundreds of millions!
 
DonH...
Posted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 12:25 pm
 
"Immortalist" <reanimater_2000 at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:24d47b29-4cf3-4d3b-b672-f38c158e0f4b at (no spam) p7g2000prb.googlegroups.com...
On Nov 12, 10:06 am, "DonH" <donlhumphr... at (no spam) bigpond.com> wrote:
[quote]"Immortalist" <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote in message

news:cd108dec-a7dc-439a-b044-dc2f0790f50f at (no spam) 37g2000prx.googlegroups.com...
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane
Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

# "The current rate of extinctions is, by some estimates, 10,000 times the
average in the fossil record." Al Gore, in his book, says 1,000 times
(which is fast enough).
The Earth, viewed from outer space, may be seen as infested by a giant
animal, let's call it Anthropomoeba Ubiquitus, which "progresses" across
the
planet, devouring everything it comes across, including Green fungi, Black
liquid, Brown rock, and Blue sea. Its excrement is everywhere and
increasing, on land, sea, and air. Eventually, it will run out of
nutrition, and be suffocated by its own excrement. By the time of its
demise
it will have exterminated most other species.
[/quote]
That reminded me of something I read years ago;

....On Earth, life elbows its way into solid, liquid, gas. No rocks, to
our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times. Tiny oceanic
microorganisms solidify carbon and oxygen gases dissolved in sea water
to produce a salt which settles on the sea floor. The deposits
eventually become pressed under sedimentary weight into stone. Tiny
plant organisms transport carbon from the air into soil and lower into
the sea bottom, to be submerged and fossilized into oil. Life
generates methane, ammonia, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and many
other gases. Iron- and metal-concentrating bacteria create metallic
ores. (Iron, the very emblem of nonlife, born of life!) Upon close
inspection, geologists have concluded that all rocks residing on the
Earth's surface (except perhaps volcanic lava) are recycled sediments,
and therefore all rocks are biogenic in nature, that is, in some way
affected by life. The relentless push and pull of coevolutionary life
eventually brings into its game the abiotic stuff of the universe. It
makes even the rocks part of its dancing mirror...

....If life were to vanish from Earth, Vernadsky realized, not only
would the planet sink back into the "chemical calm" of an equilibrium
state, but the clay deposits, limestone caves, ores in mine, chalk
cliffs, and the very structure of all that we consider the Earth's
landscape would retreat. "Life is not an external and accidental
development on the terrestrial surface. Rather, it is intimately
related with the constitution of the Earth's crust," Vernadsky wrote
in 1929. "Without life, the face of the Earth would become as
motionless and inert as the face of the moon."...

...."Living matter is the most powerful geological force," Vernadsky
claimed, "and it is growing with time." The more life, the greater its
material force. Humans intensify life further. We harness fossil
energy and breathe life into machines. Our entire manufactured
infrastructure-as an extension of our own bodies-becomes part of a
wider, global-scale life. As the carbon dioxide from our industry
pours into the air and alters the global air mix, the realm of our
artificial machines also becomes part of the planetary life. Jonathan
Weiner writing in The Next One Hundred Years then can rightly say,
"The Industrial Revolution was an astonishing geological event." If
rocks are slow life, then our machines are quicker slow life...

...."The entire range of living matter on Earth, from whales to
viruses, from oaks to algae, could be regarded as constituting a
single living entity, capable of manipulating the Earth's atmosphere
to suit its overall needs and endowed with faculties and powers far
beyond those of its constituent part." Lovelock called this view
Gaia....

Out of Control - The Rise of Neo-Biological Civilization
Kevin Kelly - 1996 http://www.kk.org/
http://www.kk.org/outofcontrol/contents.php

# All "life" lives off something, usually other life, though plants tend to
live off soil minerals, or nutrients in the sea, except when saprophytes
(fungi) or carnivorous (venus fly trap).
Hence, a predator is only as viable as it has prey; and a non-predator,
as nutrition is available.
All of which depends on habitat being appropriate in other ways, and the
more complex a living being, the greater the demand on environmental
conditions - a cockroach can better survive nuclear war than us, as the
cockroach's genetic structure is simpler, and mutations less likely to be
fatal.
At present, the whole mass of humans can be considered at virtual war
with its habitat; our attitude is too cavalier to be sustainable, and soon
our degraded ecology will collapse under pressure of our rapacious demands -
then, while life may survive, it will be of the "primitive" type. If a
Garbage Heap is "home"; Welcome!
 
Mark Earnest...
Posted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 1:15 pm
 
On Nov 12, 4:35 pm, bert <herbertglazie... at (no spam) msn.com> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 10:19 pm, Mark Earnest <gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:





On Nov 11, 8:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:

We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Very few went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today
as lizards and birds.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Cockroach  been around for 250,000,000 years.Reason for that is  Its
black. Very clever,and watches its back
[/quote]
Oh that's why they see your foot coming!
 
Robert Cohen...
Posted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 5:56 pm
 
On Nov 13, 6:15 pm, Mark Earnest <gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 12, 4:35 pm, bert <herbertglazie... at (no spam) msn.com> wrote:





On Nov 11, 10:19 pm, Mark Earnest <gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:

On Nov 11, 8:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:

We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Very few went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today
as lizards and birds.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Cockroach  been around for 250,000,000 years.Reason for that is  Its
black. Very clever,and watches its back

Oh that's why they see your foot coming!- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
[/quote]
One source most likely is radiation accumulations
causing massive deaths, so what's new about this?

airport sceening machines, every airplane trip, that adds up

cellular telephones, cell towers: Ted Kennedy's brain cancer
supposedly located where the phone is constantly,
and there are seemingly mucho millions of youngish "addicts"
throughout the world potentially similarly brain tumor vulnerable

plus all the usual potential contributors, including

dental and medical x-rays

background radiation, earthen basements

sunrays, who didn't lay on the beach, not wear shirt as child

nuclear plants, whether they're reporting or more likely covering up
the
accidental releases

from snafu laser use (depending on what lasers cause besides burning)

from weaponry & ammo of modern weaponry, as reported frm irak

and what about microwave ovens and wonderful hugemoungous
tv sets of today

also medication of water supply with flouidati... no, that's for
paranoia about c generally
 
 
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