Main Page | Report Page

 

  Science Forum Index » Energy - Hydrogen Forum » high freq electz...

Author Message
Guest
Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 7:11 am
 
I have a buddy who is an underwater welder. When he welds, there is a
danger of flamable gas buildup if he is working in an enclosed
structure underwater where the gasses cant escape to the surface.
Recently I built a stainless container that contained 12 spark plugs
(stainless) that were isolated grounds. The plugs would fire from one
to another at a rapid rate producing gas bubbles. The faster I ran the
spark rotation, the more gas bubbles were formed. I'm not a scientist,
but does this process sound feasible. I also need to know the crucial
storage pressure of these gasses so I don't blow myself up in my shop.
I am not a scientist, but more a mechanic. My unit has two guages to
read line and tank pressure, but I need to know the maximums at say a
high of 120 degrees ambient temperature.
I suppose I should retake chemistry.
Thanks guys.
 
Eeyore
Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 7:42 am
 
saltydiscus@hotmail.com wrote:

[quote:0dd00fb60c]I have a buddy who is an underwater welder. When he welds, there is a
danger of flamable gas buildup if he is working in an enclosed
structure underwater where the gasses cant escape to the surface.
Recently I built a stainless container that contained 12 spark plugs
(stainless) that were isolated grounds. The plugs would fire from one
to another at a rapid rate producing gas bubbles. The faster I ran the
spark rotation, the more gas bubbles were formed. I'm not a scientist,
but does this process sound feasible. I also need to know the crucial
storage pressure of these gasses so I don't blow myself up in my shop.
I am not a scientist, but more a mechanic. My unit has two guages to
read line and tank pressure, but I need to know the maximums at say a
high of 120 degrees ambient temperature.
I suppose I should retake chemistry.
[/quote:0dd00fb60c]
What on earth are you trying to do ?

Graham
 
Don Lancaster
Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 11:20 am
 
saltydiscus@hotmail.com wrote:
[quote:d8e4b408ac]I have a buddy who is an underwater welder. When he welds, there is a
danger of flamable gas buildup if he is working in an enclosed
structure underwater where the gasses cant escape to the surface.
Recently I built a stainless container that contained 12 spark plugs
(stainless) that were isolated grounds. The plugs would fire from one
to another at a rapid rate producing gas bubbles. The faster I ran the
spark rotation, the more gas bubbles were formed. I'm not a scientist,
but does this process sound feasible. I also need to know the crucial
storage pressure of these gasses so I don't blow myself up in my shop.
I am not a scientist, but more a mechanic. My unit has two guages to
read line and tank pressure, but I need to know the maximums at say a
high of 120 degrees ambient temperature.
I suppose I should retake chemistry.
Thanks guys.

[/quote:d8e4b408ac]

The efficiency of such a system, when properly full burden accounted,
would be utterly and laughingly negligible.

And thus a humongous net energy SINK.

Neglecting the fact that your bubbles are most likely primarily plain
old water vapor.

ANY use of electricity from high value sources to produce hydrogen
through electrolysis is doomed to failure because of a fundamental
thermodynamic principle called "exergy".

http://www.tinaja.com/glib/energfun.pdf and
http://www.tinaja.com/glib/muse153.pdf for detailed tutorials

--
Many thanks,

Don Lancaster voice phone: (928)428-4073
Synergetics 3860 West First Street Box 809 Thatcher, AZ 85552
rss: http://www.tinaja.com/whtnu.xml email: don@tinaja.com

Please visit my GURU's LAIR web site at http://www.tinaja.com
 
 
Page 1 of 1    
All times are GMT - 5 Hours
The time now is Tue Sep 02, 2014 4:24 am