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Author Message
Ruud Harmsen
Posted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:12 am
 
Thu, 10 Jun 2004 11:31:01 +0200: Miguel Carrasquer <mcv@wxs.nl>: in
sci.lang:

[quote:b27d704f1f]What is the authoritative story of the word(s)?

Corominas assumes the word spread from Gascon cabilhau to
Basque (baka(i)lao), French (cabillaud) and further to
Castilian (bacallao > bacalao), Portuguese (bacalhau),
Catalan (bacallà), Dutch (kabeljauw, bakkeljauw), etc.
[/quote:b27d704f1f]
That Dutch "bakkeljauw" (a word I didn't even know myself, depsite
being Dutch) is interesting. The WNT (Woordenboek der Nederlandsche
Taal) says:

===
Gelijkbet. BAKELJAUW (BAKELAUW) [...] is omstreeks het begin van de
17de eeuw ontleend aan bask. bakallao, kabeljauw, dat — met eene in 't
Baskisch gewone consonant-omzetting — zelf te voren aan mnl.-mnd.
kabel(j)auw zal zijn ontleend.
===

(my translation):
BAKELJAUW (BAKELAUW), with the same meaning [as kabeljauw] is an early
17th century loan-word from Basque bakallao, kabeljauw, which — with
metathesis common in Basque — probably came from Middle-Dutch / Middle
Low German kabel(j)auw.


--
Ruud Harmsen, http://rudhar.com/index/whatsnew.htm
 
Miguel Carrasquer
Posted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 5:06 am
 
On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 12:48:13 +0200, Miguel Carrasquer
<mcv@wxs.nl> wrote:

[quote:e738d53c4d]Cod is indigenous to the North Atlantic (from
Terranova/Newfoundland to Norway).
[/quote:e738d53c4d]
Also in the Baltic Sea.

The common Scandinavian name is þorsk > torsk, Ge. Dorsch (>
Pol. dorsz).

=======================
Miguel Carrasquer Vidal
mcv@wxs.nl
 
Miguel Carrasquer
Posted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:30 pm
 
On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 09:49:32 +1200, benlizross
<benlizro@ihug.co.nz> wrote:

[quote:e4abe044b4]But there's another fish with a similar looking name, in English called
capelin, from French capelan which is said to be from Provencal. This
seems to be etymologically the same as "chaplain", going back to Latin
capella "chapel".
I would have thought this a mere fortuitous similarity of names, except
that the Concise Oxford mentions the use of the capelin as cod-bait; and
the Petit Larousse says that the capelan is "voisin de la morue". Could
cabilhau be cognate with this?

(Not knowing much about fish, I can't say why either "chaplain" or "head
+ ?" would be an appropriate designation for a particular fish. Can
anyone explain?)
[/quote:e4abe044b4]
Funny you should mention that, because I was earlier
considering the same thing, but ended up rejecting the
capelin/chaplain connection. One additional piece of
information is that a common name for dried cod in early
Spanish was abadejo (diminutive of abad "abbot"), adding
another ecclesiastical connection.

But the basic and insuperable hurdle is the -b- in
bacalao/cabilhau. The word chaplain comes from Latin
cappella:nus (with -pp-), which gives Romance forms with -p-
(chaplain, capellà etc.). I don't know off-hand the Gascon
equivalent, but I would guess caperau (?) (-ll- becomes -r-
or -th in Gascon), a form which cannot be connected to
cabilhau.

So, for <abadejo>, I would be inclined to accept Corominas'
explanation: dried and cured cod was known as curadillo,
curadejo (from <curar> "cure (in salt)"), which was
misinterpreted as a derivative of <cura> "(catholic) priest"
(Fr. curé), from which the variant <abadejo> was derived.


=======================
Miguel Carrasquer Vidal
mcv@wxs.nl
 
Ruud Harmsen
Posted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:34 pm
 
Fri, 11 Jun 2004 09:49:32 +1200: benlizross <benlizro@ihug.co.nz>: in
sci.lang:

[quote:5e7bd76e68]But there's another fish with a similar looking name, in English called
capelin, from French capelan which is said to be from Provencal. This
seems to be etymologically the same as "chaplain", going back to Latin
capella "chapel".
I would have thought this a mere fortuitous similarity of names, except
that the Concise Oxford mentions the use of the capelin as cod-bait; and
the Petit Larousse says that the capelan is "voisin de la morue". Could
cabilhau be cognate with this?
[/quote:5e7bd76e68]
Not very likely, because I'd expect the c to have been softened to g
in Portuguese then. OTOH, cf. cabeça from Latin capitia < caput, so
maybe initial k does remain k.


--
Ruud Harmsen, http://rudhar.com/index/whatsnew.htm
 
Ekkehard Dengler
Posted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 11:46 am
 
"Ruud Harmsen" <realemailseesite01@rudhar.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:jncgc0d84puunorfic3f5qajtqbg1t3474@4ax.com...
[quote:90585c1c4f]Thu, 10 Jun 2004 11:31:01 +0200: Miguel Carrasquer <mcv@wxs.nl>: in
sci.lang:

What is the authoritative story of the word(s)?

Corominas assumes the word spread from Gascon cabilhau to
Basque (baka(i)lao), French (cabillaud) and further to
Castilian (bacallao > bacalao), Portuguese (bacalhau),
Catalan (bacallà), Dutch (kabeljauw, bakkeljauw), etc.

That Dutch "bakkeljauw" (a word I didn't even know myself, depsite
being Dutch) is interesting. The WNT (Woordenboek der Nederlandsche
Taal) says:

===
Gelijkbet. BAKELJAUW (BAKELAUW) [...] is omstreeks het begin van de
17de eeuw ontleend aan bask. bakallao, kabeljauw, dat - met eene in 't
Baskisch gewone consonant-omzetting - zelf te voren aan mnl.-mnd.
kabel(j)auw zal zijn ontleend.
[/quote:90585c1c4f]
Hi Ruud.

No, I haven't got the answer, but in case you're interested in another
couple of opinions, here goes:

Porto Editora: "do neerl. <cabbeliau>"

Texto Editora: "do lat. <baccalaureu>" [!]

Regards,
Ekkehard
 
Octaviano
Posted: Fri May 13, 2005 11:06 am
 
Gascon "cabilhau" (cognate with Spanish "capellán") literally means "big headed". It HAS NO latin etymon (such as *capilianu) because is a ROMANCE derivative from "cap" (head). So Dutch "kabeljauw" and French "cabillaud" were borrowed directly from Gascon.

The Basque metatized form "bakailau" (where -il- is the spelling for -lh-) gave both Portuguese "bacalhau"and Catalan "bacallà". And another Basque form "bakalau" (depalatized) gave Spanish "bacalao".

But the common word for "cod" in Northern Castilia, Rioja, Southern Navarra and Aragon is "abadejo" (little abbot).
 
 
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