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Immortalist...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 4:05 pm
 
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld
 
ta...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 5:15 pm
 
On Nov 11, 9:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld
[/quote]
Virus:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGOBm2J4tn0&feature=related
 
Mark Earnest...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 5:19 pm
 
On Nov 11, 8:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld
[/quote]
Very few went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today
as lizards and birds.
 
Sir Frederick Martin...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:58 pm
 
On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:05:40 -0800 (PST), Immortalist <reanimater_2000 at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:

[quote]We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld
[/quote]
Another, similar to 20, is the recognition that the canonic common
folk talk models of what it is and means to be human, are incorrect.
Correcting those, will cast revolution at minimum, probably not destruction.
This may be a basis for fearing science, it is also the most likely.

Those models worked well when 'we' were in hunter-gatherer mode,
the context and times have changed.
 
Robert Cohen...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:41 am
 
On Nov 11, 10:19 pm, Mark Earnest <gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 8:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:





We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Very few went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today
as lizards and birds.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
[/quote]
Massive hysterical laughing from isolated cannabalism getting
off of hand <from cliche: "gettin' outa hand," there is a laughing
disease associated with natives of
New Guinea, where my father-in-law vacationed a coupla years in WW II>

Semi-Living Murphy's law exponent Robert Cohen gets ahold of brother's
blue chemistry set <Albert
Shanker, NY teachers union, movie allusion, ancient Woody Koningsberg
film>
 
hanson...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:23 pm
 
"ta" <tapadlr at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote:
Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:

[quote]"ta" <tapadlr at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote:
gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com wrote:
"Robert Cohen" wrote:

In full-fledged paranoia Immoralistic Immortalist wrote:
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

ta, ta, ta wrote:[/quote]
Virus:
<http://www.youtube.com/watch>
[Hilarious comments about Green shits & Global
Warmners by serious funny man George Carlin]
[quote]
gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com wrote:[/quote]
Very few species went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today as lizards and birds
[quote]
"Robert Cohen" <robtcohen at (no spam) msn.com> wrote:[/quote]
my father-in-law vacationed a coupla years in WW II
due to Massive hysterical laughing from cannabalism
with natives of New Guinea

hanson wrote:
== Fearmongering pays, big time. Back then & now.
It created Politics and Religions, which are
systems used by the few to fuck the many.
== OTOH Fear mongering has evolutionary value:
-------- Only the paranoid survive ------------
[quote]
Thanks for the laughs, guys.... ahahaha... ahahahanson[/quote]
 
bert...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:35 pm
 
On Nov 11, 10:19 pm, Mark Earnest <gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 8:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:





We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Very few went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today
as lizards and birds.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
[/quote]
Cockroach been around for 250,000,000 years.Reason for that is Its
black. Very clever,and watches its back When humankind destroyes
itself the cockroach will still roam the Earth. This post is
deadicated to "big Moe" TreBert
 
tooly...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:54 pm
 
On Nov 11, 9:58 pm, Sir Frederick Martin <mmcne... at (no spam) fuzzysys.com>
wrote:
[quote]On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:05:40 -0800 (PST), Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Another, similar to 20, is the recognition that the canonic common
folk talk models of what it is and means to be human, are incorrect.
Correcting those, will cast revolution at minimum, probably not destruction.
This may be a basis for fearing science, it is also the most likely.

Those models worked well when 'we' were in hunter-gatherer mode,
the context and times have changed.
[/quote]
Immort covered this on number 19.
 
tooly...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:57 pm
 
On Nov 12, 1:06 pm, "DonH" <donlhumphr... at (no spam) bigpond.com> wrote:
[quote]"Immortalist" <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote in message

news:cd108dec-a7dc-439a-b044-dc2f0790f50f at (no spam) 37g2000prx.googlegroups.com...
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

# "The current rate of extinctions is, by some estimates, 10,000 times the
average in the fossil record."    Al Gore, in his book, says 1,000 times
(which is fast enough).
     The Earth, viewed from outer space, may be seen as infested by a giant
animal, let's call it Anthropomoeba Ubiquitus, which "progresses" across the
planet, devouring everything it comes across, including Green fungi, Black
liquid, Brown rock, and Blue sea.  Its excrement is everywhere and
increasing, on land, sea, and air.  Eventually, it will run out of
nutrition, and be suffocated by its own excrement. By the time of its demise
it will have exterminated most other species.
[/quote]
I saw that movie too; not "Neo's" better role.
Those fucking evil puking scum bucket human beings. We need to get
rid of every last one of them.
 
DonH...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:06 pm
 
"Immortalist" <reanimater_2000 at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:cd108dec-a7dc-439a-b044-dc2f0790f50f at (no spam) 37g2000prx.googlegroups.com...
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

# "The current rate of extinctions is, by some estimates, 10,000 times the
average in the fossil record." Al Gore, in his book, says 1,000 times
(which is fast enough).
The Earth, viewed from outer space, may be seen as infested by a giant
animal, let's call it Anthropomoeba Ubiquitus, which "progresses" across the
planet, devouring everything it comes across, including Green fungi, Black
liquid, Brown rock, and Blue sea. Its excrement is everywhere and
increasing, on land, sea, and air. Eventually, it will run out of
nutrition, and be suffocated by its own excrement. By the time of its demise
it will have exterminated most other species.
 
hanson...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:54 pm
 
"DonH" <donlhumphries at (no spam) bigpond.com> wrote:
[quote]"ta" <tapadlr at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote:
Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
"ta" <tapadlr at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote:
gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com wrote:
"Robert Cohen" wrote:

In full-fledged paranoia Immoralistic Immortalist wrote:
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

ta, ta, ta wrote:
Virus:
http://www.youtube.com/watch
[Hilarious comments about Green shits & Global
Warmners by serious funny man George Carlin]

gmearn... at (no spam) yahoo.com wrote:
Very few species went extinct.
The dinosaurs live today as lizards and birds

"Robert Cohen" <robtcohen at (no spam) msn.com> wrote:
my father-in-law vacationed a coupla years in WW II
due to Massive hysterical laughing from cannabalism
with natives of New Guinea
[/quote]
AlGoreian "DonH" <donlhumphries at (no spam) bigpond.com> gored & wrote:
Al Gore says 1,000 times , The Earth is infested with
Anthropomoeba Ubiquitus, which includes Green fungi
which will be suffocated by its own excrement.
[quote]
hanson wrote:[/quote]
== Fearmongering pays, big time. Back then & now.
It created Politics and Religions, which are
systems used by the few to fuck the many.
== OTOH Fear mongering has evolutionary value:
-------- Only the paranoid survive ------------
[quote]
Thanks for the laughs, guys.... ahahaha... ahahahanson

[/quote]
 
Ed...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:49 pm
 
On Nov 11, 9:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:
[quote]We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld
[/quote]
-21 We get out-competed for essential resources by another species.

Only hubris kept this off the list; we can't imagine that we aren't
the be-all and end-all of species.
 
dsi1...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:24 pm
 
On 11/11/2010 4:05 PM, Immortalist wrote:
[quote]We've had a good run of it.
[/quote]
Sounds like you like to end your races at the start. As it goes, we
ain't been around long enough to make our impression on this planet's
record any more than a smudge or a tiny footnote. Technological man has
been around maybe 20,000 years? Industrial age man maybe a couple of
hundred? Digital age man - 60? There's creatures around that have
survived mostly unchanged for several hundred million years. How can you
compare that to 200 years or even 20,000? As far as life goes, we
haven't had a good run of it - we ain't even out of the gate.

In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
[quote]roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
- 1 Asteroid impact
- 2 Gamma-ray burst
- 3 Collapse of the vacuum
- 4 Rogue black holes
- 5 Giant solar flares
- 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
- 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
- 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
- 9 Global warming
- 10 Ecosystem collapse
- 11 Biotech disaster
- 12 Particle accelerator mishap
- 13 Nanotechnology disaster
- 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
- 15 Global war
- 16 Robots take over
- 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
- 18 Alien invasion
- 19 Divine intervention
- 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindale
http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld[/quote]
 
Immortalist...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:53 pm
 
On Nov 11, 7:15 pm, ta <tapa... at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote:
[quote]On Nov 11, 9:05 pm, Immortalist <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote:



We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

Virus:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGOBm2J4tn0&feature=related
[/quote]
30 INFORMATION OVERLOAD
29 GENETICALLY MODIFIED SUPERHUMANS
28 SPACE COLONY UPRISING
27 ALIEN PLAGUE
26 SUPERBOMB
25 WEATHER-CONTROL MISHAP
24 TIME TRAVEL
23 STRANGE MATTER
22 DARK MATTER CLUMP
21 SOLAR SHUTDOWN

http://discovermagazine.com/2010/oct/30-ways-the-world-could-end/article_view?b_start:int=0&-C
George Carlin: Global Warming Denier … ?

This video is the rage among the Global Warming denial sect, as they
pass it around and post it with great glee following Carlin’s death.
Their RIP is a celebration that George was one of theirs.

You got people around you.
The country’s full of them right
now, people walking around all day
long, every minute of the day, worried
about everything … the greatest arrogance
of them all, Save the Planet. … I’m getting
tired of this shit.

Celebrate George “Global Warming Denier” Carlin!


Hold on a second …

Carlin’s Saving the Planet is seriously the rage, check “the” Google
if you don’t believe me. As I understand it, this was from Carlin’s
last show on cable, we’re not talking something decades ago. The
language is harsh

“Haven’t we done enough. We’re so self-important. So self-important.
Everybody’s gonna save something now. Save the trees. Save the bees.
Save the whales. Save those snails. And the greatest arrogance of all,
save the planet. What? Are these fucking people kidding me? Save the
planet? We don’t even know how to take care of ourselves yet. We
haven’t learned how to care for one another and we’re gonna save the
fucking planet? I’m getting tired of that shit, tired of that shit,
tired. I’m tired of fucking Earth Day. I’m tired of these self-
righteous environmentalists. These white, bourgeois, liberals who
think the only thing wrong with this country is there aren’t enough
bicycle paths. People trying to make the world safe for their Volvos.
Besides, environmentalists don’t give a shit about the planet, they
don’t care about the planet. Not in the abstract they don’t. You know
what they’re interested in? A clean place to live. Their own habitat.
They’re worried some day in the future they might be personally
inconvenienced.”

Yes, this is being celebrated by the denier world. For
example

I saw his last ravings where he points out the gall we have to think
we make such a vast difference to the global condition.

**We puny humans might create
garbage, pollution, etc, but in the
history of the earth, we are insignificant. **

No, clearly humanity is unable to have a global impact. Would all-out
nuclear war have an impact? If you answer yes, then you evidently
have “the gall”.

BUT

The denialists are celebrating, loving up this piece, but they are not
looking at the subtext nor are they looking other Carlin words and
perspectives on Global Warming.

there is nothing wrong with the planet. Nothing wrong with the planet.
The planet is fine. The people are fucked. Difference. The planet is
fine. Compared to the people the planet is doing great.

This is almost Gaia thesis.

Humanity might wound, might damage itself, but will the planet
remember a million, a billion years from now? Carlin didn’t seem to
think so:

The planet will be here for a long, long, long time after we’re gone.
And it will heal itself. It will cleanse itself, because that’s what
it does. It’s a self-correcting system. The air and the water will
recover. The earth will be renewed.

But let’s look past Save the Planet for other perspective on George
Carlin and Global Warming.
Don’t you hope it gets completely out of control …

Watch this and one gets a bit of a different perspective on Carlin and
Glo at the same time one of those month-long Global Warming heat waves
comes along …

No, Carlin doesn’t really come off as much of a denier in this one.

There’s no learning curve with these people …

No, the deniers have no interested in learning, even as they have fun
showing up a George Carlin rant.
From A TV interview last fall

“People are selfish,” he said. “These people with the fires and the
floods and everything, they overbuild and they put nature to the test,
and they get what’s coming to them, that’s what I say.”

Joy Behar replied, “That’s a little harsh, George.”

But the 70-year-old comic continued: “People think nature is outside
of them. They don’t take into [themselves] the idea that nature is a
part of them.” Pointing to his chest, he said, “Nature is in here, and
if you’re in tune with it, like the Indians – the balance of life, the
harmony of nature – if you understand that, you don’t overbuild, you
don’t do all this moron stuff.”

Jamie Lee Curtis on that same ET segment

“Global warming, combined with people building houses in places they
shouldn’t, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera,” she said. “It just
compounds to become, as they call it, a perfect storm experience here.
It’s not by accident. This isn’t an act of God. This is an act of
man.”

So what …

Not sure of the “so what”, but after the 50th time receiving a link to
Carlin’s “Saving the Planet” rant or seeing it on denier sites this
week, it starts to get tiresome. If we care so desperately about
Carlin’s “Seven Words” and mourn his passing, what should we think of
“Saving the Planet” and the deniers celebration of it?

Carlin’s rant is biting against (“white-lilied”) environmentalists and
those acting to deal with quite real problems. My understanding of
and appreciation for Carlin drove me to take the moment to do a deeper
dive, to explore beneath the surface. Beneath the surface, George
“Global Warming Denier” Carlin ceases to exist, after thought and
examination, the rant is not denier, but Gaia theory. And, it (and
other pieces) express not just humor but that Carlin’s fundamental
rage is not with activist environmentalists, but with those who jump
into their McSUV to drive 20 extra miles to get organic butter, proud
of themselves for having a “Save the Planet” bumper sticker. Even
more so, these are rants against humanity’s rape of the planetary
system.

Nowdo you get it why I celebrate when nature gets even with humans?

With fires, floods, melting ice, is George celebrating as Global
Warming catches up with us?

RIP George.

http://energysmart.wordpress.com/2008/06/27/george-carlin-global-warming-denier/
 
Immortalist...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:07 pm
 
On Nov 12, 10:06 am, "DonH" <donlhumphr... at (no spam) bigpond.com> wrote:
[quote]"Immortalist" <reanimater_2... at (no spam) yahoo.com> wrote in message

news:cd108dec-a7dc-439a-b044-dc2f0790f50f at (no spam) 37g2000prx.googlegroups.com...
We've had a good run of it. In the 500,000 years Homo sapiens has
roamed the land we've built cities, created complex languages, and
sent robotic scouts to other planets. It's difficult to imagine it all
coming to an end. Yet 99 percent of all species that ever lived have
gone extinct, including every one of our hominid ancestors. In 1983,
British cosmologist Brandon Carter framed the "Doomsday argument," a
statistical way to judge when we might join them. If humans were to
survive a long time and spread through the galaxy, then the total
number of people who will ever live might number in the trillions. By
pure odds, it's unlikely that we would be among the very first
hundredth of a percent of all those people. Or turn the argument
around: How likely is it that this generation will be the one unlucky
one? Something like one fifth of all the people who have ever lived
are alive today. The odds of being one of the people to witness
doomsday are highest when there is the largest number of witnesses
around—so now is not such an improbable time.

Human activity is severely disrupting almost all life on the planet,
which surely doesn't help matters. The current rate of extinctions is,
by some estimates, 10,000 times the average in the fossil record. At
present, we may worry about snail darters and red squirrels in
abstract terms. But the next statistic on the list could be us.

Natural Disasters
 - 1 Asteroid impact
 - 2 Gamma-ray burst
 - 3 Collapse of the vacuum
 - 4 Rogue black holes
 - 5 Giant solar flares
 - 6 Reversal of Earth's magnetic field
 - 7 Flood-basalt volcanism
 - 8 Global epidemics

Human-Triggered Disasters
 - 9 Global warming
 - 10 Ecosystem collapse
 - 11 Biotech disaster
 - 12 Particle accelerator mishap
 - 13 Nanotechnology disaster
 - 14 Environmental toxins

Willful Self-Destruction
 - 15 Global war
 - 16 Robots take over
 - 17 Mass insanity

A Greater Force Is Directed Against Us
 - 18 Alien invasion
 - 19 Divine intervention
 - 20 Someone wakes up and realizes it was all a dream

by Corey S. Powell, with additional research by Diane Martindalehttp://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featworld

# "The current rate of extinctions is, by some estimates, 10,000 times the
average in the fossil record."    Al Gore, in his book, says 1,000 times
(which is fast enough).
     The Earth, viewed from outer space, may be seen as infested by a giant
animal, let's call it Anthropomoeba Ubiquitus, which "progresses" across the
planet, devouring everything it comes across, including Green fungi, Black
liquid, Brown rock, and Blue sea.  Its excrement is everywhere and
increasing, on land, sea, and air.  Eventually, it will run out of
nutrition, and be suffocated by its own excrement. By the time of its demise
it will have exterminated most other species.
[/quote]
That reminded me of something I read years ago;

....On Earth, life elbows its way into solid, liquid, gas. No rocks, to
our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times. Tiny oceanic
microorganisms solidify carbon and oxygen gases dissolved in sea water
to produce a salt which settles on the sea floor. The deposits
eventually become pressed under sedimentary weight into stone. Tiny
plant organisms transport carbon from the air into soil and lower into
the sea bottom, to be submerged and fossilized into oil. Life
generates methane, ammonia, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and many
other gases. Iron- and metal-concentrating bacteria create metallic
ores. (Iron, the very emblem of nonlife, born of life!) Upon close
inspection, geologists have concluded that all rocks residing on the
Earth's surface (except perhaps volcanic lava) are recycled sediments,
and therefore all rocks are biogenic in nature, that is, in some way
affected by life. The relentless push and pull of coevolutionary life
eventually brings into its game the abiotic stuff of the universe. It
makes even the rocks part of its dancing mirror...

....If life were to vanish from Earth, Vernadsky realized, not only
would the planet sink back into the "chemical calm" of an equilibrium
state, but the clay deposits, limestone caves, ores in mine, chalk
cliffs, and the very structure of all that we consider the Earth's
landscape would retreat. "Life is not an external and accidental
development on the terrestrial surface. Rather, it is intimately
related with the constitution of the Earth's crust," Vernadsky wrote
in 1929. "Without life, the face of the Earth would become as
motionless and inert as the face of the moon."...

...."Living matter is the most powerful geological force," Vernadsky
claimed, "and it is growing with time." The more life, the greater its
material force. Humans intensify life further. We harness fossil
energy and breathe life into machines. Our entire manufactured
infrastructure-as an extension of our own bodies-becomes part of a
wider, global-scale life. As the carbon dioxide from our industry
pours into the air and alters the global air mix, the realm of our
artificial machines also becomes part of the planetary life. Jonathan
Weiner writing in The Next One Hundred Years then can rightly say,
"The Industrial Revolution was an astonishing geological event." If
rocks are slow life, then our machines are quicker slow life...

...."The entire range of living matter on Earth, from whales to
viruses, from oaks to algae, could be regarded as constituting a
single living entity, capable of manipulating the Earth's atmosphere
to suit its overall needs and endowed with faculties and powers far
beyond those of its constituent part." Lovelock called this view
Gaia....

Out of Control - The Rise of Neo-Biological Civilization
Kevin Kelly - 1996 http://www.kk.org/
http://www.kk.org/outofcontrol/contents.php
 
 
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