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Chris Ianson
Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 10:39 am
 
Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a self-test kit or other
diagnosis information to determine whether someone has low or reduced levels
of Latent Inhibition?

http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2003/10.23/01-creativity.html --
"They put 182 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students through a series
of tests involving 1) listening to repeated strings of nonsense syllables,
2) hearing background noise, and 3) watching yellow lights on a video
screen. (The researchers do not want to reveal details of how latent
inhibition was scored because such tests are still going on with other
subjects.)
The students also 4) filled out questionnaires about their creative
achievements on a new type of form developed by Carson, and they 5) took
standard intelligence tests. When all the scores and test results were
compared, the most creative students had lower scores for latent inhibition
than the less creative."

Sadly it doesn't explain how the tests were done.

Thanks in advance Smile
 
Chris Degnen
Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 10:36 pm
 
Too inhibited to say.

Chris Ianson wrote:
[quote:eaef9ce4ed]
Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a
self-test kit or other diagnosis information to determine
whether I have low or reduced levels of Latent Inhibition?[/quote:eaef9ce4ed]
 
Chris Degnen
Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:07 am
 
Oh, no reply. My post not sensible enough I presume.
Well it wasn't, so I'll make up for it.

If you chance upon a copy of Wilfred Trotter's book
Instincts of the Herd in Peace and War you'll find on
pages 54-60 an observation of two personality types:
one insensitive, 'stable', and "reality resistive", and the
other sensitive, perceptive, but prone to neurosis. He
says of the 'stable' variety: "Early in history the bulk
of mankind must have been of this type, because
experience, being still relatively simple, would have
but little suggestive force, and would therefore
readily be suppressed by herd suggestion." He
proceeds to describe the type as "the waggoner upon
the footplate of the express engine, which has made
the modern history of nations a series of such
breathless adventures and hairbreadth escapes."
It's dated 1909, and though he doesn't develop the
theme of the sensitive type very far, he really nailed it.

If you're a sensitive type why not just eschew the
madding crowd.


Chris Degnen wrote:
[quote:1b7401147a]
Too inhibited to say.

Chris Ianson wrote:

Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a
self-test kit or other diagnosis information to determine
whether I have low or reduced levels of Latent Inhibition?
[/quote:1b7401147a]
 
Chris Ianson
Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:43 am
 
Thanks, but just looking for a test that can be performed to see if someone
has Low Latent Inhibition. Not sure how your post answers that questions as
it is not a test. Thanks anyway.

"Chris Degnen" <tilting@windmills.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:dskni5$22dd$1@newsreader.cw.net...
[quote:1503273a5f]Oh, no reply. My post not sensible enough I presume.
Well it wasn't, so I'll make up for it.

If you chance upon a copy of Wilfred Trotter's book
Instincts of the Herd in Peace and War you'll find on
pages 54-60 an observation of two personality types:
one insensitive, 'stable', and "reality resistive", and the
other sensitive, perceptive, but prone to neurosis. He
says of the 'stable' variety: "Early in history the bulk
of mankind must have been of this type, because
experience, being still relatively simple, would have
but little suggestive force, and would therefore
readily be suppressed by herd suggestion." He
proceeds to describe the type as "the waggoner upon
the footplate of the express engine, which has made
the modern history of nations a series of such
breathless adventures and hairbreadth escapes."
It's dated 1909, and though he doesn't develop the
theme of the sensitive type very far, he really nailed it.

If you're a sensitive type why not just eschew the
madding crowd.


Chris Degnen wrote:

Too inhibited to say.

Chris Ianson wrote:

Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a
self-test kit or other diagnosis information to determine
whether I have low or reduced levels of Latent Inhibition?
[/quote:1503273a5f]
 
Chris Degnen
Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 11:17 am
 
Chris Ianson wrote:
[quote:b9aee0c1e4]
Thanks, but just looking for a test that can be performed to see if someone
has Low Latent Inhibition. Not sure how your post answers that questions as
it is not a test. Thanks anyway.
[/quote:b9aee0c1e4]
Excursive supplement to "Anyone with experience of Low Latent Inhibition?"

If the other side of the coin is perceptual resistivity perhaps a false-inference
test would be of use, if you can't find the one you want. It depends what
dimension your interested in.
 
Paul Campbell
Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:20 pm
 
Chris,

First let me say, I know comparatively little about this subject. However,
there does appear to be substantial amounts of information on the internet
about the testing procedures used for Low Latent Inhibition. One rather
technical paper is available at
http://homepages.gold.ac.uk/aphome/belfastli.pdf and despite the elaborate
title does explain their procedures for the testing within the paper.

I went to the trouble to actually try and find such a "self" test for you,
but was unsuccessful. While at first blush this may seem like bad news, you
might actually consider this the opportunity of a lifetime! Your question,
or rather the fact that there is no readily available answer to it, means
you have the opportunity to DEVELOP such a self-test! If such a self-test
does not exist, and it is possible to do, then you can singlehandly change
the world, at least in a small way. I admit the idea is a daunting task, but
may well be worth the effort. Certainly give it some consideration.

Warmest regards,

Paul Campbell, President
Applied Primary Research
http://www.appliedprimaryresearch.com


"Chris Ianson" <notme@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Ds2Hf.18085$wl.6876@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
[quote:f2dfedbf57]Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a self-test kit or other
diagnosis information to determine whether someone has low or reduced
levels of Latent Inhibition?

http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2003/10.23/01-creativity.html --
"They put 182 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students through a series
of tests involving 1) listening to repeated strings of nonsense syllables,
2) hearing background noise, and 3) watching yellow lights on a video
screen. (The researchers do not want to reveal details of how latent
inhibition was scored because such tests are still going on with other
subjects.)
The students also 4) filled out questionnaires about their creative
achievements on a new type of form developed by Carson, and they 5) took
standard intelligence tests. When all the scores and test results were
compared, the most creative students had lower scores for latent
inhibition than the less creative."

Sadly it doesn't explain how the tests were done.

Thanks in advance Smile
[/quote:f2dfedbf57]
 
Chris Ianson
Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:38 pm
 
Thanks Paul.

"The baseline test battery consisted of two neuropsychologicaltests from the
CANTAB system (SWM and TOL), three eyemovement tests (reflexive saccades,
anti-saccades and smoothpursuit); and a 16-item VARS."

I had rather hoped for something simpler I could do at home with my
partner - e.g. have her flash the light on and off repeatedly and have me
count the number of times or something, and if I notice it more than x
number, then I have Low LI.

Anyone able to boil this down to a home test? Despite the invitation Paul,
I don't think I have the time to develop such a thing, and it may well
already exist.

Thanks :)

"Paul Campbell" <primaryresearch@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:I1pHf.13929$rH5.4297@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
[quote:3259011af9]Chris,

First let me say, I know comparatively little about this subject. However,
there does appear to be substantial amounts of information on the internet
about the testing procedures used for Low Latent Inhibition. One rather
technical paper is available at
http://homepages.gold.ac.uk/aphome/belfastli.pdf and despite the elaborate
title does explain their procedures for the testing within the paper.

I went to the trouble to actually try and find such a "self" test for you,
but was unsuccessful. While at first blush this may seem like bad news,
you might actually consider this the opportunity of a lifetime! Your
question, or rather the fact that there is no readily available answer to
it, means you have the opportunity to DEVELOP such a self-test! If such a
self-test does not exist, and it is possible to do, then you can
singlehandly change the world, at least in a small way. I admit the idea
is a daunting task, but may well be worth the effort. Certainly give it
some consideration.

Warmest regards,

Paul Campbell, President
Applied Primary Research
http://www.appliedprimaryresearch.com


"Chris Ianson" <notme@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Ds2Hf.18085$wl.6876@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a self-test kit or other
diagnosis information to determine whether someone has low or reduced
levels of Latent Inhibition?

http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2003/10.23/01-creativity.html --
"They put 182 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students through a
series of tests involving 1) listening to repeated strings of nonsense
syllables, 2) hearing background noise, and 3) watching yellow lights on
a video screen. (The researchers do not want to reveal details of how
latent inhibition was scored because such tests are still going on with
other subjects.)
The students also 4) filled out questionnaires about their creative
achievements on a new type of form developed by Carson, and they 5) took
standard intelligence tests. When all the scores and test results were
compared, the most creative students had lower scores for latent
inhibition than the less creative."

Sadly it doesn't explain how the tests were done.

Thanks in advance :)


[/quote:3259011af9]
 
 
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