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Infinite Rider...
Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:48 pm
 
Quote:
Yep, but probably not thousands of screaming girls to contend with.

Screaming was the one thing I noticed on a lot of the music tv shows
whenever most acts appeared, but many of the artists and groups didn't
have the same reaction whenever concert footage was shown. That led me
to wonder as to whether the screaming of the in-house studio audience
of a music tv show was genuine or post-production sweetening, canned
screaming?

Quote:
By the seventies pro audio equipment and live sound production techniques
had improved out of sight compared to the sixties! And many live recordigs
of the seventies are pretty good even by todays standards.
(Many aren't of course.)

The live albums of the 70s probably sounded better if you had better
stereo equipment to play them on. Some of the stereos of the 70s were
like waxed fruit, a term used by those with more discriminating tastes
in stereo equipment. Some of the concerts though, didn't make the
transistion to LP very well. Wonder how many live albums from the 70s
have been reissued to cd? I recall Nez didn't want to reissue the
"Palais" album to cd because he didn't consider it a good recording
but he finally relented and added some extra songs (from other
concerts). The cd version of that album is one on my cds-to-add lists,
as although the sound could've been mixed better, I still liked most
of the album.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 3:13 am
 
"brilton" <notlirb at (no spam) yacht.net> wrote in message
news:qs8Co.1773$MF5.419 at (no spam) viwinnwfe02.internal.bigpond.com...
Quote:
The last ever (and only) recordings of the Beatles in Hamburg? the only
recording of them playing in a licensed venue? The only live recording
of them not playing in-front of excitable female fans?

Right, never heard them, never really cared Smile. Don't even play the Live at
the BBC stuff very often and I bet it's infinitely better. But I do have
everything the Beatles ever released commercially. Same with the Monkees,
and as I said, hardly ever play "Live 1967".
I'm not saying others can't choose what they listen to of course!

TonyP.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 3:45 am
 
"Infinite Rider" <catgod29 at (no spam) aol.com> wrote in message
news:99f1ad95-715b-46ff-a80c-9530b61f986d at (no spam) o11g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Screaming was the one thing I noticed on a lot of the music tv shows
whenever most acts appeared, but many of the artists and groups didn't
have the same reaction whenever concert footage was shown. That led me
to wonder as to whether the screaming of the in-house studio audience
of a music tv show was genuine or post-production sweetening, canned
screaming?

They usually tell the audience beforehand they want lots of screaming
whenever the applause light comes on, and most are happy to comply. If not
they just add canned stuff as you suggest.


Quote:
The live albums of the 70s probably sounded better if you had better
stereo equipment to play them on. Some of the stereos of the 70s were
like waxed fruit, a term used by those with more discriminating tastes
in stereo equipment.

That's me Smile ALWAYS had stereo FAR more expensive than most. I paid $1,000
for a pair of speakers in the early seventies, and nearly as much again for
a turntable. Still have them! (BIG money at the time when many people had
$100 complete "stereo's") I wouldn't let my records near those abominations,
that's why they are still in excellent condition, unlike the vast majority
that aren't fit for the garbage dump. All irrelevant now though if you buy
the remastered CD's and have a decent Hi-Fi to listen on now, with even the
cheapest of CD players.


Quote:
Some of the concerts though, didn't make the
transistion to LP very well. Wonder how many live albums from the 70s
have been reissued to cd?

Quite a few, in fact some have just been released for the first time in
recent years. Neil Young Live at Massey Hall for example. Not exactly state
of the art, even for 1971, but a lot better than most of the sixties stuff.
And of course one of the biggest selling records of the seventies here was
Neil Diamonds Hot August Night. It's been available in the shops here ever
since AFAIK, on vinyl then CD. The CD has been re-released a number of
times, with added tracks, added artwork etc.



Quote:
I recall Nez didn't want to reissue the
"Palais" album to cd because he didn't consider it a good recording
but he finally relented and added some extra songs (from other
concerts). The cd version of that album is one on my cds-to-add lists,
as although the sound could've been mixed better, I still liked most
of the album.

I don't have the CD either as I converted the vinyl myself many years ago.
Wouldn't mind extra tracks, but the cost of shipping it here has always
stopped me. Even though it was actually recorded right here in Melbourne, I
don't think the CD has ever been available locally, unless I missed it.

TonyP.
 
brilton...
Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:27 am
 
On 10/11/10 4:13 PM, TonyP wrote:
Quote:
"brilton"<notlirb at (no spam) yacht.net> wrote in message
news:qs8Co.1773$MF5.419 at (no spam) viwinnwfe02.internal.bigpond.com...
The last ever (and only) recordings of the Beatles in Hamburg? the only
recording of them playing in a licensed venue? The only live recording
of them not playing in-front of excitable female fans?

Right, never heard them, never really cared Smile.


Oh well. Star Club has always been a favourite of mine. If you can get
past the audio quality (which some people have tweaked a bit in this
last year to make it sound marginally better), it really "rocks", to use
a phrase the Americans are fond of. It's arguably one of the earliest
bootlegs of the pop age. And literally the last recording of the group
before they started doing theatre tours playing the same songs night
after night.



Don't even play the Live at
Quote:
the BBC stuff very often and I bet it's infinitely better.



The BBC stuff is better recorded and better fidelity, but they weren't
allowed to turn their amps up very much, so it sounds a bit tame.
 
Infinite Rider...
Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:49 am
 
Quote:
They usually tell the audience beforehand they want lots of screaming
whenever the applause light comes on, and most are happy to comply. If not
they just add canned stuff as you suggest.

That's true though I wonder how many audience members ever noticed
their favorite artists were lip-synching and miming their unplugged
musical instruments. Even the Beatles could be seen faking it on a
song or two. Not that it mattered, if you happened to be a fan and
just being in the same room and breathing the same air was enough for
you. I would imagine the canned stuff wasn't used very often though
there were a few acts I just couldn't see the audience getting that
excited about.

Quote:
That's me Smile ALWAYS had stereo FAR more expensive than most. I paid $1,000
for a pair of speakers in the early seventies, and nearly as much again for
a turntable. Still have them! (BIG money at the time when many people had
$100 complete "stereo's") I wouldn't let my records near those abominations,
that's why they are still in excellent condition, unlike the vast majority
that aren't fit for the garbage dump. All irrelevant now though if you buy
the remastered CD's and have a decent Hi-Fi to listen on now, with even the
cheapest of CD players.

I eventually got an expensive stereo system but for years, all I had
to make do with was one of those cheapies, which had bass and treble
on the same knob. Most of my records are still in excellent condition,
though I didn't play them all that often on the cheap stereo system.
I'd still rather listen to cds through my almost 20-year old stereo
than on the cheapest of cd players. Most cheap cd players still look
like a piece of waxed fruit, including some models still sharing the
bass and treble on one knob.

Quote:
Quite a few, in fact some have just been released for the first time in
recent years. Neil Young Live at Massey Hall for example. Not exactly state
of the art, even for 1971, but a lot better than most of the sixties stuff.
And of course one of the biggest selling records of the seventies here was
Neil Diamonds Hot August Night. It's been available in the shops here ever
since AFAIK, on vinyl then CD. The CD has been re-released a number of
times, with added tracks, added artwork etc.

I forgot about the Neil Diamond album. It's been a big seller for
years here in the US. Not sure if a cd edition of the album came with
extra tracks. I don't recall the Neil Young title as Neil was riding
pretty high with the "Harvest" album in 1971 and it wasn't that long
before he was represented in the US as part of CSN&Y on "Four Way
Street." Still, it could've been released here and I just don't
remember it.

Quote:
I don't have the CD either as I converted the vinyl myself many years ago.
Wouldn't mind extra tracks, but the cost of shipping it here has always
stopped me. Even though it was actually recorded right here in Melbourne, I
don't think the CD has ever been available locally, unless I missed it.

I had Videoranch make a custom cd for me a few years back (for the
song "January") and picked out a couple of the bonus tracks from the
"Palais" album to fill out the cd. One was the other version of "Grand
Ennui,' which wasn't as good as the Palais version of the song. And
the version of "Listen to the Band," from the Gretsch guitar concert.
That version reminded me of the version Nez did with the First
National Band. Very fast and kind of loose and not too bad.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:56 am
 
"Infinite Rider" <catgod29 at (no spam) aol.com> wrote in message
news:84b85438-171a-4336-8e73-271c88dda91b at (no spam) o23g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
That's true though I wonder how many audience members ever noticed
their favorite artists were lip-synching and miming their unplugged
musical instruments.

Quite a few, but it was pretty much expected anyway.

Quote:
Even the Beatles could be seen faking it on a
song or two. Not that it mattered, if you happened to be a fan and
just being in the same room and breathing the same air was enough for
you. I would imagine the canned stuff wasn't used very often though


Not for the Beatles or Monkees. No need to add more :-)

Quote:
there were a few acts I just couldn't see the audience getting that
excited about.

No doubt.


Quote:
I eventually got an expensive stereo system but for years, all I had
to make do with was one of those cheapies, which had bass and treble
on the same knob. Most of my records are still in excellent condition,
though I didn't play them all that often on the cheap stereo system.
I'd still rather listen to cds through my almost 20-year old stereo
than on the cheapest of cd players. Most cheap cd players still look
like a piece of waxed fruit, including some models still sharing the
bass and treble on one knob.

I define CD player as only one part of a stereo system, not the whole
system. I wouldn't even consider "boom boxes" as a stereo system. Even a $25
DVD player plugged into a *decent* stereo system can produce better
performance that 99% of turntables ever made. Not all CD's are mastered well
of course, but some are better than vinyl ever was.


Quote:
I forgot about the Neil Diamond album. It's been a big seller for
years here in the US. Not sure if a cd edition of the album came with
extra tracks.

Walk on Water, Kentucky Woman and Stones were added a few years ago.


Quote:
I don't recall the Neil Young title as Neil was riding
pretty high with the "Harvest" album in 1971 and it wasn't that long
before he was represented in the US as part of CSN&Y on "Four Way
Street." Still, it could've been released here and I just don't
remember it.

AFAIK it was never released anywhere until very recently. It was originally
slated for release, but got pulled because of all the other material you
mentioned.


Quote:
I had Videoranch make a custom cd for me a few years back (for the
song "January") and picked out a couple of the bonus tracks from the
"Palais" album to fill out the cd. One was the other version of "Grand
Ennui,' which wasn't as good as the Palais version of the song. And
the version of "Listen to the Band," from the Gretsch guitar concert.
That version reminded me of the version Nez did with the First
National Band. Very fast and kind of loose and not too bad.

I have Crippled Lion and LTTB from the Gretch concert, but don't have
January or any other version of Grand Ennui other than on Nevada Fighter and
LatP.

TonyP.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 1:32 am
 
"Infinite Rider" <catgod29 at (no spam) aol.com> wrote in message
news:dbd580c2-66d7-493d-bf5a-932d84bbfc8f at (no spam) s11g2000prs.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
True but still, why would they resent the Monkees bringing in their
own personnel?

Who knows, either plain stupidity, or your rumour got it wrong perhaps.


Quote:
Unless they simply resented having to come into work
and get paid for doing nothing. Having to go into work and not do
anything (because of breakdowns) and still get paid for it happened to
me on a few occasions and that was something I didn't mind at all.

Me either. Unfortunately I don't usually get paid when I'm doing nothing,
even when I have to sit around waiting. That is annoying!


Quote:
Along with other coworkers, we once had to sit out an entire eight
hour shift because the equipment broke. The company could've save
themselves money (including for overtime) if they would've just sent
everyone home as they were still waiting five or six hours later after
we went home for replacement parts.

Yes, but obviously they were hoping to get things fixed far sooner. I'll bet
money you weren't being paid from the pocket of the person who made the
decision to keep anyone there on overtime!


Quote:
And since Nez claimed that actor Jack Nicholson took over the
supervising and mixing of the soundtrack, it's conceivable Nicholson
could've been the one picking the "buried vocals" version of CS.


Seems quite likely.


Quote:
True, but I was thinking of those who had been somewhat swayed by the
critics without hearing a single note of music by the Monkees. Of
course, many of them were just as unlikely as the critics to change
their minds but when the opportunity presented itself, sometimes a
person could change their mind.

Very few it seems to me unfortunately. In any case I never cared what the
people who never listened to a particular artists think of them. I'm quite
happy to think for myself.


Quote:
I think people simply got burned out on him with that album. Radio
stations played many of the album tracks on a hourly basis at the
height of its popularity. His hits from that album were still getting
heavy rotation on the radio when his next album came out and continued
to be played long after his next album and single had mostly been
forgotten by all but his most diehard fans. Radio overkill is never
good for almost any artist or band wanting a long term career

Actually it's pretty much always a good thing as long as the overkill
continues onto the next album, and the next etc.
That they stuck with old songs rather than play anything new is the problem
of course. Why they did so is the question, and I can't say I'm familiar
enough with PF's later material to comment on it.


Quote:
It's more difficult for me to play a whole album through in the car
because I'm never driving very far when I'm out on the road.


Me either a lot of the time, but the CD starts up where it left off. And
other times I have to drive for many hours, so listening to all of many
albums in a row happens too.


Quote:
If I have
the time at home, sometimes I'll play an album all the way through.
But, I usually want to listen to a wide variety of what I have in the
way of musi, so it's usually just a few tracks here and there on most
albums.

Yep, having thousands of hours of MP3's on the computer, with instant access
and customised play lists means listening to all of an album in the original
sequence is not that common at home for me either.


Quote:
I know but it's mostly the "authorized" copies with unreleased
material which gets bootlegged.

Not sure about that. I've never seen any real proof one way or the other.


Quote:
But, if a bootlegger knew what you had
as to its potential to make money and knew their way to your location,
they would probably bother you to no end in trying to get you to make
them a copy

Sure, but I just say no, and tell them why.


Quote:
or failing that, breaking into your home to take it.

Fortunately it hasn't happened yet. Did have a car stolen once though :-(


Quote:
Orchestrations are sometimes added after the basic rhythm tracks and
vocal tracks are recorded, sometimes not always right away but several
months later.

Yes very common.


Quote:
The horns and strings on Elvis's version of "Suspicious
Minds" weren't added until about a month before it was officially
released, which was several months after it was recorded. An arranger
can work off a demo version but that may not be the version of the
song that ends up being released.

Right. When Elvis was making records it's unlikely anybody would go home
with a half finished tape to work on it though. But these days of course it
happens all the time. (files not tapes) Files are even bounced across the
net without producers, arrangers, or artists ever being in the studio at the
same time, or even in the same country! :-)

TonyP.
 
Infinite Rider...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:06 pm
 
Quote:
Quite a few, but it was pretty much expected anyway.

I don't know. One would think the teen audience was aware and hip to
what was going on but how many truly noticed because they had stars in
their eyes and the excitement of the moment? I could've seen the teens
not being distracted by reality and thinking the performers and groups
really were performing "live."

Quote:
Not for the Beatles or Monkees. No need to add more Smile

Quite true.

Quote:
there were a few acts I just couldn't see the audience getting that
excited about.

No doubt.

Speaking of not being able to see the audience getting too excited
about a performer, I recall a lot of corny cornball country music tv
shows in the 60s where the audience didn't get excited very often and
had to be reminded to applaud the country performer. What was insane
about that was the audience would applaud the performer
indiscriminately: at the end of the first verse and the start of the
second verse and sometimes the third verse, sometimes on the chorus or
hook, sometimes not. One sensed someone was messing up with an
"applause" sign or had no concept of when to encourage the audience to
applaud.

Quote:
I define CD player as only one part of a stereo system, not the whole
system. I wouldn't even consider "boom boxes" as a stereo system. Even a $25
DVD player plugged into a *decent* stereo system can produce better
performance that 99% of turntables ever made. Not all CD's are mastered well
of course, but some are better than vinyl ever was.

I don't consider a "boom box" a stereo system but they are often the
modern day equivalent of the waxed fruit stereos. And I agree with you
about dvd players producing a better performance than 99% of the
turntables, and that some cds are better than what the vinyl version
ever was. I've heard about a turntable which plays the vinyl album
with a laser instead of a needle and the playback is as good as the
cd. The vinyl is played in the same way as the cd and presumably, the
vinyl album could be played as loud as the cd with no worry of
turntable rumble and reverb in the speakers. I figured it would've
caught on with the diehards who'd rather hold onto their old vinyl
recordings than buy a cd or digital download or what have you. Hasn't
happened and probably won't happened as it hasn't exactly caught on
with the general public either. But, it would be the perfect turntable
for old vinyl, especially for recordings that have yet to see the
light of day or may never see the light of day on cd.

Quote:
Walk on Water, Kentucky Woman and Stones were added a few years ago.

I was thinking KW was already on HAN, but must admit haven't looked at
the album in ages. I always liked the other two songs. "Stones" still
gets some airplay on one of the radio stations but "Walk On Water" is
truly an undeserved forgotten oldie.

Quote:
AFAIK it was never released anywhere until very recently. It was originally
slated for release, but got pulled because of all the other material you
mentioned.

Sort of like Elvis's "Standing Room Only" album in 1972. RCA later
fashioned an album of recordings from circa 1972 with that title,
including "Burning Love" and the rest of the songs he recorded in the
studio that year, and completing the album with songs that were
recorded in concert. Only trouble is, the original album was intended
to be another Vegas concert album and not a mix of studio and live
material. The original album was scratched when RCA decided to record
Elvis's Madison Square Garden concert appearances instead. Elvis's
live albums in the 70s were starting to become the equivalent of the
movie soundtracks. Too many in too short of a time.

Quote:
I have Crippled Lion and LTTB from the Gretch concert, but don't have
January or any other version of Grand Ennui other than on Nevada Fighter and
LatP.

Think I also have "The Crippled Lion" from the Gretsch concert on that
cd. "January" is no longer available on Nez's website, which was odd
as one would've thought Nez would've kept his catalogue in print. And
as "January," like "Helen's Eternal Birthday" was available via
download or as a custome made cd, there was no extremely large
overhead expenses in keeping the track in print with that method.
Maybe he regretted making it available?
 
Infinite Rider...
Posted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:10 pm
 
Quote:
Who knows, either plain stupidity, or your rumour got it wrong perhaps.

The source I believe was one of the Monkees themselves, either Davy or
Mike. I'll have to look it up again, recall which book the quote is
in.

Quote:
Me either. Unfortunately I don't usually get paid when I'm doing nothing,
even when I have to sit around waiting. That is annoying!

Businesses here probably wouldn't pay an employee if they could get
away with it. The only way they could get away with it would be to let
the employee go home. Since they live in the hope that what was broken
will be fixed sooner than later, they will keep the employees on the
clock. But, people sitting around with nothing to do get tired and
sleepy. The place I worked at had no tvs in the break room to watch,
just a radio which no one was permitted to turn on. What the point was
in having something in the break room you couldn't listen to was
beyond me and everyone else who worked there.

Quote:
Yes, but obviously they were hoping to get things fixed far sooner. I'll bet
money you weren't being paid from the pocket of the person who made the
decision to keep anyone there on overtime!

Damned right! The decision was made by a supervisor who of course made
no effort to contact who was above him to see if their preference
would've been to have kept the employees waiting all night or send
them home early and save the company money.

Quote:
Very few it seems to me unfortunately. In any case I never cared what the
people who never listened to a particular artists think of them. I'm quite
happy to think for myself.

Same here though I will sometimes make an attempt to convince a friend
or two as to the error of their ways about the artists I listen to who
are not always fashionably hip.

Quote:
Actually it's pretty much always a good thing as long as the overkill
continues onto the next album, and the next etc.
That they stuck with old songs rather than play anything new is the problem
of course. Why they did so is the question, and I can't say I'm familiar
enough with PF's later material to comment on it.

That's definitely true of the radio stations here in the US with a 70s
format. The local 70s station here once touted that it didn't have to
be old to be a classic and once upon a time, they played new material
by artists from the 70s. Not anymore. The format is rigid and firmly
frozen in time from three to four decades ago and stations like that
are usually the only hope an artist from that time has that his or her
or their new music will be heard.
..
Quote:
Me either a lot of the time, but the CD starts up where it left off. And
other times I have to drive for many hours, so listening to all of many
albums in a row happens too.

I'm superstitious about playing a cd in the car. Like playing a
cassette tape back in the day, I don't trust a car stereo system when
it comes to discs. I'll play a burned cd I've made or have had made
rather than placing a cd I've bought at the store, online or by mail
order. I don't want to end up losing something I've paid $20 to a car
stereo...better to play a recordable disc instead. Not as much money
involved.

Quote:
Yep, having thousands of hours of MP3's on the computer, with instant access
and customised play lists means listening to all of an album in the original
sequence is not that common at home for me either.

With my stereo, I have the option of programming and playing an album
in a different sequence rather than the original sequence. It's
interesting to hear an album another way. Many times, it feels like
I'm listening to another album altogether rather than one I may have
had in my collection for decades now.

Quote:
Not sure about that. I've never seen any real proof one way or the other.

I say "authorized" as in studio material because a bootlegged concert
isn't something owned by the record companies. Record companies to me
can only lose money when the bootleg consists of unreleased studio
songs or unreleased alternate takes of officially released material.
The record companies have no financial investment in a bootleg concert
and only an artist or band and songwriters (if different from the
artist or band) are losing any kind of income because the bootlegger
isn't paying royalties to them.

Quote:
Fortunately it hasn't happened yet. Did have a car stolen once though Sad

I've been broken into three times. Never had a car stolen, just some
personal belongings. If I could've caught them, I would've torn them
down and put up a parking lot in their place! But, I guess it's enough
they are going to prison or are in prison for their crimes.

Quote:
Right. When Elvis was making records it's unlikely anybody would go home
with a half finished tape to work on it though. But these days of course it
happens all the time. (files not tapes) Files are even bounced across the
net without producers, arrangers, or artists ever being in the studio at the
same time, or even in the same country! Smile

I still see a lot of recordings where all the instruments or most of
the instruments are played by just one person. Being a one man band is
kind of cool but if you're not a solo artist and you've worked with
others in a band on a regular basis, I'd rather hear what they
contributed to your works. Playing what may have been their parts and
passing it off as a group recording might be insulting to some of the
musicians and they may resent it.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 12:15 am
 
"Infinite Rider" <catgod29 at (no spam) aol.com> wrote in message
news:49153618-fc28-4fa3-9ac7-395071a16b9c at (no spam) r31g2000prg.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
I don't consider a "boom box" a stereo system but they are often the
modern day equivalent of the waxed fruit stereos. And I agree with you
about dvd players producing a better performance than 99% of the
turntables, and that some cds are better than what the vinyl version
ever was. I've heard about a turntable which plays the vinyl album
with a laser instead of a needle and the playback is as good as the
cd.

Actually NO. Apart from the fact that the laser turntable costs a *fortune*,
it has big problems with dust in the grooves, so also requires a proper
record cleaning machine as a minimum. Add in the fat that most vinyl was
pretty ordinary to start with (and most old disks even worse now), and what
you have is a *very* expensive way of getting performance that is still
inferior to a $25 DVD player.


Quote:
The vinyl is played in the same way as the cd and presumably, the
vinyl album could be played as loud as the cd with no worry of
turntable rumble and reverb in the speakers.

Well yes rumble, feedback and further record wear will be eliminated at
least, but not noise, distortion or wow and flutter. Tests I have seen say
that a better turntable/tonearm/cartridge of normal design, can be purchased
for far less money. But you CAN pay even more if you want. However anybody
who spends $100k just to play vinyl records has FAR more money than sense
IMO!


Quote:
I figured it would've
caught on with the diehards who'd rather hold onto their old vinyl
recordings than buy a cd or digital download or what have you. Hasn't
happened and probably won't happened as it hasn't exactly caught on
with the general public either. But, it would be the perfect turntable
for old vinyl, especially for recordings that have yet to see the
light of day or may never see the light of day on cd.

Nope, as I said FAR from perfect, which is why when you consider the cost,
it has not caught on with hardly anyone at all.


Quote:
Sort of like Elvis's "Standing Room Only" album in 1972. RCA later
fashioned an album of recordings from circa 1972 with that title,
including "Burning Love" and the rest of the songs he recorded in the
studio that year, and completing the album with songs that were
recorded in concert. Only trouble is, the original album was intended
to be another Vegas concert album and not a mix of studio and live
material. The original album was scratched when RCA decided to record
Elvis's Madison Square Garden concert appearances instead. Elvis's
live albums in the 70s were starting to become the equivalent of the
movie soundtracks. Too many in too short of a time.

Yep, I was amazed how many live recording they officially released (not even
counting the unofficial one) and how many songs were the same on many of
them. I think even the fans would have grown a little tired of them
releasing even more.


Quote:
Think I also have "The Crippled Lion" from the Gretsch concert on that
cd. "January" is no longer available on Nez's website, which was odd
as one would've thought Nez would've kept his catalogue in print. And
as "January," like "Helen's Eternal Birthday" was available via
download or as a custome made cd, there was no extremely large
overhead expenses in keeping the track in print with that method.
Maybe he regretted making it available?

Possibly, what do you think of it?

TonyP.
 
TonyP...
Posted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 12:49 am
 
"Infinite Rider" <catgod29 at (no spam) aol.com> wrote in message
news:19e99d24-2d60-4907-a269-8050578975db at (no spam) n32g2000prc.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
I'm superstitious about playing a cd in the car. Like playing a
cassette tape back in the day, I don't trust a car stereo system when
it comes to discs. I'll play a burned cd I've made or have had made
rather than placing a cd I've bought at the store, online or by mail
order. I don't want to end up losing something I've paid $20 to a car
stereo...better to play a recordable disc instead. Not as much money
involved.

I *only* play burned CD's in the car, but mainly because I don't want to
lose the originals if the car is broken into or stolen. Don't care about the
cost of a few blanks I can burn again. There is another big benefit too, I
can put >75 minutes of music on each one, rather than <30 minutes on some
originals. That is quite often 2 (almost) complete CD's, (or more) of my
favourite artists, or a mix compilation for lesser ones. I hate changings
CD's when driving. On long trips I just plug in an MP3 player of course.


Quote:
With my stereo, I have the option of programming and playing an album
in a different sequence rather than the original sequence. It's
interesting to hear an album another way. Many times, it feels like
I'm listening to another album altogether rather than one I may have
had in my collection for decades now.

Yeah I could do that long ago, but rarely do. If I play an album rather than
my own play list, I just play it as normal. And I find the "random" function
of most players to be useless if you stop and start the player, since most
only keep track of the CD/play list and last track played. And I usually
prefer the original sequence in any case, simply deleting the tracks I
really don't want to listen to.


Quote:
I say "authorized" as in studio material because a bootlegged concert
isn't something owned by the record companies. Record companies to me
can only lose money when the bootleg consists of unreleased studio
songs or unreleased alternate takes of officially released material.
The record companies have no financial investment in a bootleg concert
and only an artist or band and songwriters (if different from the
artist or band) are losing any kind of income because the bootlegger
isn't paying royalties to them.

True, but even then ONLY if the buyers would have paid enough for an
official version to make a profit. A bootleg would VERY rarely affect the
sales of official album releases IMO, certainly not like pirate copies of
the official albums do.


Quote:
I've been broken into three times. Never had a car stolen, just some
personal belongings. If I could've caught them, I would've torn them
down and put up a parking lot in their place! But, I guess it's enough
they are going to prison or are in prison for their crimes.

Lucky you then, I have had things stolen, as well as my car, but the police
had no inclination at all in finding those involved. Unless the amounts
involved are *very* large, it is given VERY LOW (read none at all) priority
IME.


Quote:
I still see a lot of recordings where all the instruments or most of
the instruments are played by just one person. Being a one man band is
kind of cool but if you're not a solo artist and you've worked with
others in a band on a regular basis, I'd rather hear what they
contributed to your works. Playing what may have been their parts and
passing it off as a group recording might be insulting to some of the
musicians and they may resent it.

Can't say I've seen that happen very often. Sure some artists who once
played in a group do solo projects, but it's usually clear the old band was
not involved. The proliferation of home studio's means that many old artists
who simply couldn't afford studio time and session musicians any longer, can
at least still record an album and sell it at gigs and on-line though. That
is a good thing IMO.

TonyP.
 
Infinite Rider...
Posted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:52 pm
 
Quote:
I *only* play burned CD's in the car, but mainly because I don't want to
lose the originals if the car is broken into or stolen. Don't care about the
cost of a few blanks I can burn again. There is another big benefit too, I
can put >75 minutes of music on each one, rather than <30 minutes on some
originals. That is quite often 2 (almost) complete CD's, (or more) of my
favourite artists, or a mix compilation for lesser ones. I hate changings
CD's when driving. On long trips I just plug in an MP3 player of course.

The 75-80 minutes of run time on a blank cd is also a great method for
making a compilation album of the various artists one listens to. And
on a long road trip, whether it's a 2 albums on one burned cd or a
compilation album, it's an alternative to listening to the radio
stations which play songs you really don't want to hear over and over
again. I like most of the songs I hear on oldies radio or 70s album
oriented rock radio but it drives me bonkers to always hear a
Fleetwood Mac song or an Eagles song or any of the others they play on
a continuous basis. Not meant to berate either FM or the Eagles
because I do happen to like them, but radio stations here have the
incredible knack of playing the same song by the same artist within a
short time frame. That could be expected on Top 40 stations, I guess,
but on stations whose formats are oldies based or 70s based and are
sometimes hundreds of miles apart or further, one would expect the
chances of that happening to be something of a high number against,
but it seems to happen nonetheless with regularity. Add to the fact
the stations involved are owned by different corporations, duplication
should be a rare, extraordinary event and not a common occurrence.

Quote:
Yeah I could do that long ago, but rarely do. If I play an album rather than
my own play list, I just play it as normal. And I find the "random" function
of most players to be useless if you stop and start the player, since most
only keep track of the CD/play list and last track played. And I usually
prefer the original sequence in any case, simply deleting the tracks I
really don't want to listen to.

Depends on my mood. The tracks I don't like listening to, I can either

skip them or if I'm in the mood to play a whole album and program
which songs come first, I'll program the ones I don't like first and
get them out of the way. I don't have that many albums which I do that
on though. Sometimes rearranging the album sequence can help out a
weaker song, but when the whole album is weak, nothing you do is going
to make the songs any better.

Quote:
True, but even then ONLY if the buyers would have paid enough for an
official version to make a profit. A bootleg would VERY rarely affect the
sales of official album releases IMO, certainly not like pirate copies of
the official albums do.

Boots don't affect the bottom line of an official album release,
though people who buy bootlegs may think why bother buying an official
release containing material they'd already obtained via the bootleg?
Of course, the quality on the bootleg may not be the greatest and
having the official release offers the chance for the songs having a
much improved sound. Most of the stuff I've heard that's been booted,
whether on cd or online, has only a so so quality to them. You hear
the hiss or other defects on a boot, but on an official release, you
usually get the cleanest version possible and hear additional sounds
the bootleg may have missed.

Quote:
Lucky you then, I have had things stolen, as well as my car, but the police
had no inclination at all in finding those involved. Unless the amounts
involved are *very* large, it is given VERY LOW (read none at all) priority
IME.

The thieves overplayed their hand by developing a multi-robbery
history through which they could be tracked and an expectation of
where they would hit next. They didn't deviate from their pattern but
stuck to it religiously. And since the robberies involved several
different people, the police waited it out until they had everyone who
was involved before making the arrests. The thieves weren't stealing
personal property per se but using the theft of personal property as a
cover for other crimes they were committing, Some of the thieves are
still awaiting trial for their crimes but it would've been nice tyo
have gotten the personal property back, though thre seems to be no
chance of that happening.

Quote:
Can't say I've seen that happen very often. Sure some artists who once
played in a group do solo projects, but it's usually clear the old band was
not involved. The proliferation of home studio's means that many old artists
who simply couldn't afford studio time and session musicians any longer, can
at least still record an album and sell it at gigs and on-line though. That
is a good thing IMO.

That's true though the artist doesn't necessarily need to use session
musicians but just the musicians who make up their band. Most multi-
instrumental musicians aren't musical overachievers like Paul
McCartney, who can play every musical instrument heard on his
recordings. Being the only musician would also have to be something
that could get old as such an arrangement may not allow the artist to
make several takes of the same song but only one take and if the
artist is a perfectionist, he or she may get frustrated with the fact
they either can't record fifty takes just to get one good take that
can be used or have to come back to the song another time if they want
to keep trying to find the right take. That could be one reason why it
took some artists several years to release a new album though I have
my doubts as although many have the ability to play several
instruments, many stick with just one or two musical instruments and
letting their own musicians or sessions players play the rest of the
instruments.
 
 
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