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Hadro...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:31 am
 
thanatoid <waiting at (no spam) the.exit.invalid> writes:

Quote:
Hadron<hadronquark at (no spam) gmail.com> wrote in
news:i3olah$hfn$1 at (no spam) news.eternal-september.org:

Homer <usenet at (no spam) slated.org> writes:

SNIP

There are certain features that GNU/Linux newsreaders tend
to not support, such as binary uploading (as you have
found), however that may be explained by the fact that few
people in the GNU/Linux community feel the need to
participate in certain types of groups which, by and
large, only really exists to support "piracy".

Total and utter nonsense.

Care to explain that interesting-yet-rather-cryptic statement?
(If you can spare a few moments...)

Yes : it's total and utter nonsense.

I cant be more clear.

Linux/Unix users have "enjoyed" binary groups for ages ; both download
and upload.
 
Hadro...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:12 am
 
Aragorn <aragorn at (no spam) chatfactory.invalid> writes:

Quote:

Well, it doesn't work like that, but then again, like I said, the people
have been lulled to sleep. And I wouldn't count on Obama to start an
investigation into "9/11" either. He's in on it just as much as all
the others are, if not by choice, then because the true powers that be
own him, just like they've owned just about every US president since
John F. Kennedy - even if only because they couldn't afford that a US
president would be turning against them for a second time - and it is
the same group of people who control the British government, and the
European Union, and much, much more...


Someone needs to give Aragorn's location to the men in the white
coats. And they need to acquire a particularly large and strong net
with which to capture this brazen loon.
 
Moshe Goldfarb...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:16 am
 
On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 19:12:04 +0200, Hadron<hadronquark at (no spam) gmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
Aragorn <aragorn at (no spam) chatfactory.invalid> writes:


Well, it doesn't work like that, but then again, like I said, the people
have been lulled to sleep. And I wouldn't count on Obama to start an
investigation into "9/11" either. He's in on it just as much as all
the others are, if not by choice, then because the true powers that be
own him, just like they've owned just about every US president since
John F. Kennedy - even if only because they couldn't afford that a US
president would be turning against them for a second time - and it is
the same group of people who control the British government, and the
European Union, and much, much more...


Someone needs to give Aragorn's location to the men in the white
coats. And they need to acquire a particularly large and strong net
with which to capture this brazen loon.


They should keep him, Rex Ballard, [Homer], Mark Bilk and
Schestowitz's entire band of loons under heavy sedation.

They are going need cases of drugs with *zine in the name to keep them
under control.

--
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Linux...Disappointing users for 19 years.
Linux::It's free when your time has no value.
See Liarmutt in action http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SazBzvQ0ZAM
 
Hadro...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:18 am
 
Moshe Goldfarb <moshe_goldfarb at (no spam) hooya.com> writes:

Quote:
On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 19:12:04 +0200, Hadron<hadronquark at (no spam) gmail.com
wrote:

Aragorn <aragorn at (no spam) chatfactory.invalid> writes:


Well, it doesn't work like that, but then again, like I said, the people
have been lulled to sleep. And I wouldn't count on Obama to start an
investigation into "9/11" either. He's in on it just as much as all
the others are, if not by choice, then because the true powers that be
own him, just like they've owned just about every US president since
John F. Kennedy - even if only because they couldn't afford that a US
president would be turning against them for a second time - and it is
the same group of people who control the British government, and the
European Union, and much, much more...


Someone needs to give Aragorn's location to the men in the white
coats. And they need to acquire a particularly large and strong net
with which to capture this brazen loon.

They should keep him, Rex Ballard, [Homer], Mark Bilk and
Schestowitz's entire band of loons under heavy sedation.

They are going need cases of drugs with *zine in the name to keep them
under control.

Just lay a trail of Ubuntu coasters along the road leading up a ramp
into a barred window van with a snapshut rear door and *bang* - a whole
nest of Freetards caught and duly processed.
 
Moshe Goldfarb...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:25 am
 
On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 19:18:03 +0200, Hadron<hadronquark at (no spam) gmail.com>
wrote:


Quote:
Just lay a trail of Ubuntu coasters along the road leading up a ramp
into a barred window van with a snapshut rear door and *bang* - a whole
nest of Freetards caught and duly processed.

Hahahha!

BTW I've found Marti!

That's Spermowitz winding him up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lFqHuJzK0U&feature=related
--
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Linux...Disappointing users for 19 years.
Linux::It's free when your time has no value.
See Liarmutt in action http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SazBzvQ0ZAM
 
Moshe Goldfarb...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:40 pm
 
On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 20:33:26 +0200, Aragorn
<aragorn at (no spam) chatfactory.invalid> wrote:

Quote:

So yes, I am communication-impaired. I was born that way, sorry.

Alright, but if you keep typing these thesis length posts you will
soon be adding carpal tunnel syndrome to your list of aliments.
--
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Linux...Disappointing users for 19 years.
Linux::It's free when your time has no value.
See Liarmutt in action http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SazBzvQ0ZAM
 
Aragorn...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:00 pm
 
On Monday 09 August 2010 20:40 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody
identifying as Moshe Goldfarb wrote...

Quote:
On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 20:33:26 +0200, Aragorn
aragorn at (no spam) chatfactory.invalid> wrote:

So yes, I am communication-impaired. I was born that way, sorry.

Alright, but if you keep typing these thesis length posts you will
soon be adding carpal tunnel syndrome to your list of aliments.

I know. <grin> And by the way, what was that again about that
spellchecker? :p

Dyxlesia lurez! :-)

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)
 
High Plains Thumper...
Posted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 9:41 pm
 
Homer wrote:
Quote:
High Plains Thumper spake thusly:

For a mechanic to listen in his shop would be considered a
violation because he is a business? This is shear nonsense.

I'm in the process of starting up a new business, and one of the
things I'm going to do is set up a music system in the shop playing
/only/ Creative Commons licensed music, and then put a sarcastic
notice in the shop window that has a PRS logo with a cross through
it, and a Creative Commons logo underneath.

What an excellent idea! I was thinking similar, defeat them at their
own game! This is one way to boycott the media trolls.

Speaking of which about a month ago, I acquired a Roland Boss BR600
multitrack recorder on clearance (replaced by the BR800). Seems to be a
nice recorder, upgraded the flash memory, I am learning the ins and
outs. Combined with the audio editing tools in Linux, seems to be a
nice compliment.

If I do post something on the 'net, it'll be an instrumental classic
"circle of fifths" progression (there are very few copyrights on chord
progressions) with solo jazz improvisation on keyboard as percussion
organ and layering my alto sax. That will avoid the copyright police
(may be).

Quote:
If any of those PRS gangsters dare to come into my shop and start
making demands and threats, I'm going to file criminal charges
against them for extortion and demanding money with menaces.

Others have fought back and won when they were in the right.

Quote:
I think the whole entertainment industry has gone bonkers.

Ultimately they're only going to destroy themselves.

Good riddance.

Agreed.

--
HPT
 
TomB...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 12:04 am
 
["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.advocacy.]
On 2010-08-09, the following emerged from the brain of Homer:
Quote:

Here's my own version of the Windows XPerience campaign:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MVfOTtD6B0

But then, it's Flash, so you probably can't watch it.

http://www.tinyogg.com

--
BOFH excuse #68:

only available on a need to know basis
 
Erik_jan...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 5:35 am
 
Homer had de volgende lumineuze gedachte op 10-08-10 03:08:

Quote:

Talking of which, don't you find it a coincidence that the Renaissance;
the greatest period of creativity, discovery and invention in the whole
history of mankind; came crashing abruptly to an end at the exact same
time as the enactment of the Statute of Monopolies?

And yet, ironically, the supposed purpose of monopolies is to "promote
the Progress of Science and useful Arts".


Dear Homer,

I believe the period before the Renaissance was very creative, perhaps
even more than during the Renaissance. During the Renaissance the
paradigm of science, "natural philosphy", changed from observation based
on aristotelian theory to experiment based on mathematical models. But
before this the foundations were laid in medieval society by catching up
with classical learning, and a lot of technical innovations that were by
far superior to classical technology. The fields were practical:
stirrups, harnesses for horses, agriculture, draining land, irrigating
land, the plow, and lots more. And the secret of all this innovation?
Sharing. The benedictine abbeys freely shared all their innovations with
other monasteries. The same method was used in the medieval
universities. All knowledge was shared. What the innovators got out of
it, was the honor. Europe became the great innovator in technology,
knowledge, and during the Renaissance in the field of natural philosophy
by way of what we call "the open source model" of cooperation. The four
freedoms of the modern GPL worked beautifully then. The benedictines and
many others knew about the moral obligation to work for the "common
wealth", the "commune bonum". Today, it seems, one does not work for the
common wealth, look at the bankers e.g., but for the money, out of greed.

so I endorse your argument and want to strengthen it even more.

Greetings,

Erik Jan.
 
William Poaster...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:03 am
 
thanatoid wrote:

Quote:
Homer <usenet at (no spam) slated.org> wrote in
news:l46vi7-icp.ln1 at (no spam) sky.matrix:

Verily I say unto thee, that thanatoid spake thusly:
Homer <usenet at (no spam) slated.org> wrote in
news:hiuri7-mkq.ln1 at (no spam) sky.matrix:
Verily I say unto thee, that thanatoid spake thusly:

SNIP


What's wrong with proprietary if it's free?

OK, how about this:

. Where's the Linux version?

It's WINDOWS browser, for people who do not like to be
victimized by MS.
Who needs a Linux version? You guys have the best browsers
/anyway/.

Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.advocacy,comp.os.linux.setup

You see *anything* about Windows in there, idiot?

<snip>

(Now i recall why I binned the windoze moron when I was in 24HSHD)

Terminated.

--
FreeBSD 8.0 64-bit; Kubuntu 10.04 64-bit
Mandriva 2010 64-bit; Scientificlinux 5.5 64-bit
Under test: Kubuntu 10.10 Alpha 2
 
Hadro...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 7:53 am
 
Erik_jan <ejvwaasdijk at (no spam) msn.com> writes:

Quote:
Homer had de volgende lumineuze gedachte op 10-08-10 03:08:


Talking of which, don't you find it a coincidence that the Renaissance;
the greatest period of creativity, discovery and invention in the whole
history of mankind; came crashing abruptly to an end at the exact same
time as the enactment of the Statute of Monopolies?

And yet, ironically, the supposed purpose of monopolies is to "promote
the Progress of Science and useful Arts".


Dear Homer,

I believe the period before the Renaissance was very creative, perhaps
even more than during the Renaissance. During the Renaissance the

Prior to the Renaissance it was effectively the middle ages in Europe
(the US had just been invented). The renaissance saw more creativity
than ever before. And why? Because formal methods were used where people
could build on the shoulders of giants.


PS Anyone interested in a good roller coaster of a book series which
covers this is pointed to Neil Stephenson's Baroque Trilogy starting
with :-

http://www.nealstephenson.com/quicksilver/


Quote:
paradigm of science, "natural philosphy", changed from observation based
on aristotelian theory to experiment based on mathematical models. But
before this the foundations were laid in medieval society by catching up
with classical learning, and a lot of technical innovations that were by
far superior to classical technology. The fields were practical:
stirrups, harnesses for horses, agriculture, draining land, irrigating
land, the plow, and lots more. And the secret of all this innovation?
Sharing. The benedictine abbeys freely shared all their innovations with
other monasteries. The same method was used in the medieval
universities. All knowledge was shared. What the innovators got out of
it, was the honor. Europe became the great innovator in technology,
knowledge, and during the Renaissance in the field of natural philosophy
by way of what we call "the open source model" of cooperation. The four
freedoms of the modern GPL worked beautifully then. The benedictines and
many others knew about the moral obligation to work for the "common
wealth", the "commune bonum". Today, it seems, one does not work for the
common wealth, look at the bankers e.g., but for the money, out of greed.

so I endorse your argument and want to strengthen it even more.

Greetings,

Erik Jan.

 
thanatoid...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 12:16 pm
 
Moshe Goldfarb <moshe_goldfarb at (no spam) hooya.com> wrote in
news:5p91669m56qpsa1d58th7pq9mp34lldl1v at (no spam) 4ax.com:

<SNIP>

Quote:
Guess you missed The Industrial Revolution.

http://www.historyguide.org/intellect/lecture17a.html

"More than the greatest gains of the Renaissance, the
Reformation, Scientific Revolution or Enlightenment, the
Industrial Revolution implied that man now had not only the
opportunity and the knowledge but the physical means to
completely subdue nature.

"implied" - and incorrectly.

Quote:
No other revolution in modern
times can be said to have accomplished so much in so little
time."

And it is leading us to total self-destruction. Yes, excellent.

My favorite is the French Revolution, FWIW.

BTW, into the plonker you go, buddy. Try to behave in there.

<SNIP>


--
Any mental activity is easy if it need not be subjected to
reality.
 
Homer...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 2:41 pm
 
Verily I say unto thee, that Erik_jan spake thusly:
Quote:
Homer had de volgende lumineuze gedachte op 10-08-10 03:08:

Talking of which, don't you find it a coincidence that the
Renaissance; the greatest period of creativity, discovery and
invention in the whole history of mankind; came crashing abruptly
to an end at the exact same time as the enactment of the Statute of
Monopolies?

And yet, ironically, the supposed purpose of monopolies is to
"promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts".
[...]
I believe the period before the Renaissance was very creative,
perhaps even more than during the Renaissance. During the Renaissance
the paradigm of science, "natural philosphy", changed from
observation based on aristotelian theory to experiment based on
mathematical models. But before this the foundations were laid in
medieval society by catching up with classical learning, and a lot of
technical innovations that were by far superior to classical
technology. The fields were practical: stirrups, harnesses for
horses, agriculture, draining land, irrigating land, the plow, and
lots more. And the secret of all this innovation? Sharing. The
benedictine abbeys freely shared all their innovations with other
monasteries. The same method was used in the medieval universities.
All knowledge was shared. What the innovators got out of it, was the
honor. Europe became the great innovator in technology, knowledge,
and during the Renaissance in the field of natural philosophy by way
of what we call "the open source model" of cooperation. The four
freedoms of the modern GPL worked beautifully then. The benedictines
and many others knew about the moral obligation to work for the
"common wealth", the "commune bonum". Today, it seems, one does not
work for the common wealth, look at the bankers e.g., but for the
money, out of greed.

There's been a gradual progression of monopolistic tendencies through
history, culminating in formalisation with the advent of the Statute of
Monopolies (primarily "patent" based), and later with the Statute of
Anne (copyrights). However, prior to that formalisation, monopolies were
infrequently issued on an ad hoc basis by oligarchical mandate, rather
than by a democratic process of common law, were usually not justified
(or justifiable) in any moral sense, and rarely had a particularly broad
scope. Then, as now, the only motive offered was the perception of
necessity, which as William Pitt the Younger once put it: "is the plea
for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants;
it is the creed of slaves".

The premise of state-protected monopolies is basically incentive, or put
less diplomatically - bribes. The idea being that a certain faction of
society (industrial capitalist), who might only be motivated by greed,
have a disincentive to do anything unless they can do so exclusively.
The lawmakers accepted that this faction were poorly motivated, and
that monopolies were morally unjustified (no inalienable right), but
they also recognised that these industrialists, by and large, held all
the power and wealth, and therefore conceded moral principles for what
they vaguely hoped would be the greater good - expedited and enhanced
invention and creation.

The reality is somewhat different. Although "invention and creation" has
most certainly been /expedited/, it's highly debatable that it's been
"enhanced". Instead of exercising moderation, and showing gratitude for
the artificial privilege of state-protected monopoly which they've been
granted, industrial capitalists have exploited it ruthlessly to produce
vast portfolios of trivial "inventions", which they then use as weapons
of totalitarianism against the rest of society, to the point that just
singing to oneself in public is seen as some kind of violation of "rights".

What began as the hope of encouraging progress, has become the single
greatest /inhibitor/ of progress, and one of the greatest threats to
human culture. Indeed it's hard to see why anyone even felt it necessary
to instigate this sort of "promotion", given that the era when it was
introduced was already the most creative and inventive in history.

This is why I advocate the abolition of all forms of Intellectual
Property rights. They should never have been introduced in the first
place, and they provide an order of magnitude more disadvantages than
advantages. They were introduced only to satisfy greed, so it's hardly
surprising that they only result in the further advancement greed.

Quote:
so I endorse your argument and want to strengthen it even more.

Thanks.

--
K.
http://slated.org

..----
| "Satisfaction with a current Android phone doesn't translate
| into desire to buy a new Android phone" ~ ZnU, CSMA refugee
`----

Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.31.5
21:41:04 up 5 days, 22:50, 0 users, load average: 0.03, 0.01, 0.00
 
Homer...
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:28 pm
 
Verily I say unto thee, that thanatoid spake thusly:
Quote:
Moshe Goldfarb <moshe_goldfarb at (no spam) hooya.com> wrote in
news:5p91669m56qpsa1d58th7pq9mp34lldl1v at (no spam) 4ax.com:

SNIP

Guess you missed The Industrial Revolution.

No, but I wish we all had, since it was this "revolution" that changed
the emphasis of human progress from creativity to mass-production, and
ultimately ... globalisation.

Quote:
"More than the greatest gains of the Renaissance, the Reformation,
Scientific Revolution or Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution
implied that man now had not only the opportunity and the knowledge
but the physical means to completely subdue nature.

"implied" - and incorrectly.

Yes, mankind has become quite adept at "subduing nature":

http://www.dba-oracle.com/golf_travel/images/a_seal_clubbing_self_defense.jpg

Quote:
No other revolution in modern times can be said to have
accomplished so much in so little time."

And it is leading us to total self-destruction. Yes, excellent.

Naturally a corporatist like "Moshe" is going to get all excited about
the birth of corporatism.

--
K.
http://slated.org

..----
| "Satisfaction with a current Android phone doesn't translate
| into desire to buy a new Android phone" ~ ZnU, CSMA refugee
`----

Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.31.5
01:28:12 up 6 days, 2:38, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
 
 
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