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Obviousman...
Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:29 pm
 
Can anyone tell me about using the regulator on the AS-186 air compressor?

I see there is the locking ring, and lifting the knob allows you to
adjust the valve... but how do I know to what pressure I am setting it,
and which way (CW / CCW) does what (increase / decrease pressure)?

Thanks!
 
El Viejo Dragon...
Posted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 10:27 am
 
Obviousman wrote:
Quote:
Can anyone tell me about using the regulator on the AS-186 air compressor?

I see there is the locking ring, and lifting the knob allows you to
adjust the valve... but how do I know to what pressure I am setting it,
and which way (CW / CCW) does what (increase / decrease pressure)?

Thanks!


As I see on photos, it has an pressure gauge. CW should open, and CCW
close the valve.

Hook up your airbrush, open the valve slightly and start the compressor,
then turn the knob watching the dial.

On the other hand, I almost never look at the pressure gauge - I thin
the paint, load the airbrush and play with the valve until I achieve the
spray pattern I want on my test surface (plastic sheet, old kit etc).

Remember, the needed air pressure depends on the consistency of your
paint and your airbrush.

Experiment.
 
John McGrail...
Posted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 10:29 am
 
On 2010-01-14, Obviousman <m8081679 at (no spam) yahoo.com.au> wrote:
Quote:
Can anyone tell me about using the regulator on the AS-186 air compressor?

I see there is the locking ring, and lifting the knob allows you to
adjust the valve... but how do I know to what pressure I am setting it,
and which way (CW / CCW) does what (increase / decrease pressure)?

Thanks!

I don't have one, so caveat emptor on my answers ...

CCW likely opens up the valve, increasing the pressure coming out.

As for knowing the pressure ... if the compressor doesn't have a regulator, get
one from your local welding supply store. The one picture I found ...

http://www.made-in-china.com/image/2f0j00dCwtLpGhYUkRM/Air-Compressor-AS-186-.jpg

shows a regulator on the back so I presume yours dones't come with one.

Hopefully, your compressor has a simlar moisture trap with 3 out connectors.
One for the regulator, and 2 for hoses.

Your local welding supply store should be able to fit you with a similar
moisture trap if your compressord didn't come with one.

In my case, my compressor (a silent-aire model) came with a regulator that
went up to 1650 lbs or so. It was difficult to dial in a
specific PSI at the low end. So I replaced it with a dial that only goes
to 80, but includes individual lines for each pound and is more sensitive
on the low end.

This makes it easy to dial in 5,8,9,12 lbs, etc since I tend to use very low
air pressure for most of my painting.

--
ratfood at (no spam) food.skaterat.net
All foods should be removed to reply
 
Don Stauffer...
Posted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 10:20 am
 
El Viejo Dragon wrote:
Quote:
Obviousman wrote:
Can anyone tell me about using the regulator on the AS-186 air
compressor?

I see there is the locking ring, and lifting the knob allows you to
adjust the valve... but how do I know to what pressure I am setting
it, and which way (CW / CCW) does what (increase / decrease pressure)?

Thanks!


As I see on photos, it has an pressure gauge. CW should open, and CCW
close the valve.

Hook up your airbrush, open the valve slightly and start the compressor,
then turn the knob watching the dial.

On the other hand, I almost never look at the pressure gauge - I thin
the paint, load the airbrush and play with the valve until I achieve the
spray pattern I want on my test surface (plastic sheet, old kit etc).

Remember, the needed air pressure depends on the consistency of your
paint and your airbrush.

Experiment.

I generally start with a pressure of 15 psi for gloss paints, 20 psi for
flats. I may have to adjust this for thinness ratio, but generally add
thinner if the paint is too thick, rather than adjust pressure. I only
address pressure if too thin.
 
Obviousman...
Posted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 1:00 pm
 
Thanks for all the replies. I finally figured out how to do it thanks to
El Viejo Dragon. The confusion for me lay in a couple of areas. Firstly
the pressure gauge - to me - seemed to be telling me the pressure inside
the tank, as it would start the pump at 43 PSI and stop at about 57 PSI.
Secondly, I couldn't really feel any difference in inflow through the
airbrush nozzle when adjusting the regulator. I didn't appreciate that
you could get delivery pressure showing on the gauge. In case there are
other people out there as stupid as I am, here is a summary:

1. Release red locking ring by turning CCW.
2. Switch compressor on and allow to build up to operating pressure.
3. Lift black knurled knob and turn CW to increase the delivery
pressure, or turn CCW to reduce delivery pressure. Delivery pressure
reading can be obtained by activating the airbrush whilst adjusting the
black regulator knob, and reading the pressure from the gauge.
4. When pressure has been correctly set, ensure the black knurled knob
has been seated properly and lock into position by turning the red
locking ring CW until finger tight.

On 1/16/2010 02:20, Don Stauffer wrote:
Quote:
El Viejo Dragon wrote:
Obviousman wrote:
Can anyone tell me about using the regulator on the AS-186 air
compressor?

I see there is the locking ring, and lifting the knob allows you to
adjust the valve... but how do I know to what pressure I am setting
it, and which way (CW / CCW) does what (increase / decrease pressure)?

Thanks!


As I see on photos, it has an pressure gauge. CW should open, and CCW
close the valve.

Hook up your airbrush, open the valve slightly and start the
compressor, then turn the knob watching the dial.

On the other hand, I almost never look at the pressure gauge - I thin
the paint, load the airbrush and play with the valve until I achieve
the spray pattern I want on my test surface (plastic sheet, old kit etc).

Remember, the needed air pressure depends on the consistency of your
paint and your airbrush.

Experiment.

 
 
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