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Josus...
Posted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:09 am
 
I just joined a 4x4 Coed League and we are looking for strategies how
to place our players, offensive and defensive strategies, etc... We
have a lot of experience in 6x6 volleyball but we want to be prepared
when the season starts. Any web site, online instructions or comments
would really be appreciated!

Thanks
Joel
 
Bruno Wolff III...
Posted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 12:02 pm
 
On 2008-09-24, Josus <josus at (no spam) videotron.ca> wrote:
Quote:
I just joined a 4x4 Coed League and we are looking for strategies how
to place our players, offensive and defensive strategies, etc... We
have a lot of experience in 6x6 volleyball but we want to be prepared
when the season starts. Any web site, online instructions or comments
would really be appreciated!

Are you playing "beach 4s" style of rules where everyone is eligible to hit?

The normal thing to do is use one or two male blockers depending on what the
other offenses are doing and how quick your blockers are. You can have
one blocker try to cover the whole net, two blockers where each covers about
half of the net with the one who doesn't end up blocking peel off the net,
or you can have two blockers try to put up a double block.

On serve receive you are going to want to your two male hitters (assuming
they are significantly more effective hitters than your female players)
hitting on far sides of the net to make it harder for the opposing blockers.

Transition is going to be the hardest to handle. It is harder than in 6s to
hide your setter and have them almost always setting after a dig that goes
toward the net. So your team members will need to communicate more to make
sure someone steps into set. What you want to try to do here depends on
how quick your players are. Ideally you want one of the two female players
stepping in to set so that both male players are free to hit, but if your
players are slow to do that consistantly, passing to one of the two male
blockers may end up being more effective for your team.
 
Josus...
Posted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 4:38 am
 
Yes it is Beach Volleyball type rules. Should I play the diamond
formation or another one? What are the differences?
Thanks
Joel
 
Bruno Wolff III...
Posted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 2:00 pm
 
On 2008-09-26, Josus <josus at (no spam) videotron.ca> wrote:
Quote:
Yes it is Beach Volleyball type rules. Should I play the diamond
formation or another one? What are the differences?

If you have three defenders (including the case where one of the two
blockers is going to peel off on the set), then you probably want to use
a diamond type defense with two defenders near the sidelines (the line
defender should be almost on it, the angle defender may be off it a bit
so that the attacker can't easily hit down in front of them) and the
third defender should be deep middle somewhere (typically making a read
as to which side of the blocker to be on). If you try to get a double
block on most of the hits then you typically will give up the middle
back defender.
It's also possible to play rotation defenses where the block tries to take
line. I can't see that really being viable for 4s.
Since we haven't gotten and indication of the level of play, I should also
mention that you can also use no blockers. In that case you probably want
a female setter at the net, the two male players playing sideline defense
and the other female player playing middle back. This defense is good when
your setters are slow in transition and the other teams players are short
and/or the setting is poor so that it is unlikely for the opposing players
to hit down.
You can also run three blocker systems, but they wouldn't normally be used
in coed play (or even normal play except at very high levels of play). You
generally lose more on defense than you gain on blocking with those systems.

The other thing you probably want to do is review what happened in matches
and note areas where your team stuggled and consider changes that could
help mitigate those problems without giving up too much in other areas.
Particularly transition play, both on digs and free balls. Generally simpler
strategies will help make sure you get hits but allow the other team an
easier defense.
 
 
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