Main Page | Report Page

 

  Hobby Forum Index » Games - Board » Scrabble - Quo

Author Message
Guest
Posted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 7:32 pm
 
So...WHY can't you use quo in Scrabble? Many words are permitted that
are rare, of foreign, origin, obsolete, etc etc, but this is in common
usage, status quo, quid pro quo, etc. When the decision was made by the
powers that be - "officialdom" at Scrabble, why not this one? Anyone
know?
 
David Parlett
Posted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 10:38 am
 
In message <1167514372.139618.166590@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com>,
mooncat@mooncats-emporium.com writes
Quote:
So...WHY can't you use quo in Scrabble? Many words are permitted that
are rare, of foreign, origin, obsolete, etc etc, but this is in common
usage, status quo, quid pro quo, etc. When the decision was made by the
powers that be - "officialdom" at Scrabble, why not this one? Anyone
know?

Perhaps because QUO does not have independent status: in English it
exists only in the compounds you have quoted. For much the same reason,
I suppose, as CUL is not listed because it exists only in the phrase
CUL-DE-SAC. If you accept QUO, you're going to have to accept other
components of compounds like CETERA, MUTATIS, MUTANDIS, and where will
it all end?
--
David Parlett
For books and games visit http://www.davidparlett.co.uk
or (shorter) http://www.davpar.com
 
Peter Clinch
Posted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 11:23 am
 
David Parlett wrote:

Quote:
Perhaps because QUO does not have independent status: in English it
exists only in the compounds you have quoted.

I think that nails it: the compounds are all imports that have
attained English usage. My Shorter Oxford has no entry for "quo"
on its own.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
Gene Wirchenko
Posted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 3:16 am
 
Peter Clinch <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> wrote:

Quote:
David Parlett wrote:

Perhaps because QUO does not have independent status: in English it
exists only in the compounds you have quoted.

I think that nails it: the compounds are all imports that have
attained English usage. My Shorter Oxford has no entry for "quo"
on its own.

dictionary.reference.com has it as a word, but it is flagged as
archaic.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko

Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation:
I have preferences.
You have biases.
He/She has prejudices.
 
Chris Mattern
Posted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 2:25 pm
 
In article <1167514372.139618.166590@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com>,
mooncat@mooncats-emporium.com wrote:
Quote:
So...WHY can't you use quo in Scrabble? Many words are permitted that
are rare, of foreign, origin, obsolete, etc etc, but this is in common
usage, status quo, quid pro quo, etc. When the decision was made by the
powers that be - "officialdom" at Scrabble, why not this one? Anyone
know?

You are *not* allowed to use foreign words. That's stated specifically

in the rules. You may use words of foreign *origin*, but they must
be english words. "Quo" is not an english word; your examples are
all of a use in a latin phrase. If you could quote me an example
of "quo" used in an english sentence and not as part of foreign phrase,
you would have more of a case.

--
Christopher Mattern

"Which one you figure tracked us?"
"The ugly one, sir."
"...Could you be more specific?"
 
 
Page 1 of 1    
All times are GMT - 5 Hours
The time now is Thu Jul 24, 2014 1:24 am