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Jane
Posted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 7:48 pm
 
I found a blue tit had got into the house. It had got harmed and most
definitely it wasn't going to live a normal life again.

If it managed to fly at all it was very probably going to die slowly
from starvation after exhausting itself.

If I had known how to do it with minumum suffering of the bird, I would
have killed it.

How do you humanely kill a (frightened and struggling) bird?
 
Alan French
Posted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 9:55 pm
 
"Jane" <jane@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9842F22FD7F5A1A7D4@127.0.0.1...
Quote:
I found a blue tit had got into the house. It had got harmed and most
definitely it wasn't going to live a normal life again.

If it managed to fly at all it was very probably going to die slowly
from starvation after exhausting itself.

If I had known how to do it with minumum suffering of the bird, I would
have killed it.

How do you humanely kill a (frightened and struggling) bird?

Jane,

I'd see if you have a local vet who treats injured wildlife. One of the
vets in our area takes injured wildlife, and will treat it if possible, or
euthanize it if the injuries are too severe for the animal to recover. The
vet does not charge in either case.

Clear skies, Alan
 
Davej
Posted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 11:54 pm
 
Jane wrote:
Quote:
[...]
How do you humanely kill...

Automobile exhaust and a plastic bag may be one method.
 
Eric Miller
Posted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 12:45 am
 
Davej wrote:
Quote:
Jane wrote:

[...]
How do you humanely kill...


Automobile exhaust and a plastic bag may be one method.


It is a similar quandary faced by hunters more often than not on the
typical hunting trip. Typically with birds, you hold the bird by the
head and twirl the body below your hand until the head separates from
the body. It takes but a second, much less time than it will take you to
find a plastic bag and your car keys. Of course, with the concern of
West Nile Virus, you may want to wear a glove, extending the ordeal long
enough to find one.

Separating the head from the body with a knife or other tool works well
too. Growing up in the rural American south, I got to see my grandmother
kill many chickens with a hatchet. There were no survivors.

Eric Miller
Alexandria, Louisiana
 
Stinkweed
Posted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 1:31 pm
 
I had a similiar thing happen to me earlier this summer, I may not have
handled it right, but I picked the bird up hoping it was in shock, I held it
in the palm of my hand. At first it was scared, but when it saw I meant no
harm it settled down and was totally at ease with me. I pet it, talked to
it and kept it warm. It seemed that it was perking up after about 20 min.
but then it died. But I at least felt like I had made it's last minutes on
earth as comfortable as I could. I really thought it would make it though.

"Jane" <jane@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9842F22FD7F5A1A7D4@127.0.0.1...
Quote:
I found a blue tit had got into the house. It had got harmed and most
definitely it wasn't going to live a normal life again.

If it managed to fly at all it was very probably going to die slowly
from starvation after exhausting itself.

If I had known how to do it with minumum suffering of the bird, I would
have killed it.

How do you humanely kill a (frightened and struggling) bird?

 
William Wagner
Posted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:27 pm
 
In article <45106915$0$3623$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
"Mike Coon" <mjcoon@@connectfee.co.uk> wrote:

Quote:
Davej wrote:
Jane wrote:
[...]
How do you humanely kill...

Smack with a hard object. Fast and reflect latter. I've done my old
cats and still reflect. But when maggots are in their mouth and they
emplore. No hard decision.


Bill who remembers it over 50 years a slayer and a provider.

--
S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance with
Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the educational
and informative purposes. This material is distributed without profit.
 
Surfer!
Posted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 4:40 am
 
In message <Xns9842F22FD7F5A1A7D4@127.0.0.1>, Jane <jane@invalid.com>
writes
<snip>
Quote:

How do you humanely kill a (frightened and struggling) bird?

One of my cats brought an injured dove in. I put it in a cat carrier
with some vet bed, and tucked it in a warm dark place to let it settle.
It became obvious that the bird was too badly hurt to be let go, but not
badly hurt enough to quietly die in a couple of hours, so I took it to
the vets who did the dead for me. The problem with killing it myself is
that if I'm quite & bold there are plenty of kind ways to do it, but if
I miss or am faint-hearted I'm likely to botch and cause suffering.

--
Surfer!
Email to: ramwater at uk2 dot net
 
Malcolm
Posted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 1:44 pm
 
In article <451162FE.70C1@mindspring.com>, Ron Hardin
<rhhardin@mindspring.com> writes
Quote:
Jane wrote:

I found a blue tit had got into the house. It had got harmed and most
definitely it wasn't going to live a normal life again.

If it managed to fly at all it was very probably going to die slowly
from starvation after exhausting itself.

If I had known how to do it with minumum suffering of the bird, I would
have killed it.

How do you humanely kill a (frightened and struggling) bird?

Pro's recommend compressing the chest, but I don't know the technique.

This is probably best used only on small birds, but then the original

question was about a blue tit. Hold the bird on its back in your cupped
hand and press your thumb firmly down on its sternum. This compresses
the diaphragm and the bird very quickly stops breathing. The trouble is,
as with all such techniques, it isn't something that one gets to put
into practice very often (thankfully) and so there is a risk of being
too tentative. It does have the advantage over other methods of not
resulting in any blood or mess.

--
Malcolm
 
Anne Burgess
Posted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 5:12 am
 
Quote:
Next best thing I guess would be to (hopefully) find a vet
close by that also treats injured wild animals. Personally,
I'd drive the 200 miles. 4 hours each way is not that big a
deal to me to help an injured animal.

I wouldn't dream of subjecting an injured animal or bird to the
stress of 4 hours' unnecessary travel in a car. I'd take it to
the nearest vet.

Anne
 
Eric Miller
Posted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:45 pm
 
Quote:

In case it was vague, my point was that David would go 400 miles out
of his way to help an injured animal. You apparently go to some
lengths to wound and then kill them, but you're criticizing about
causing suffering. Why not reevaluate what you're doing first.

You made no point, you asked a question and assumed that your unstated
"point" was obvious, I guess, simply because it was yours.

If you, like David, had paid attention to the OP's question, you also might
have seen (though that prospect is somewhat doubtful) that he was not asking
for everyone's testimony about the lengths that they would go to to prolong
the suffering of a dying animal. He wasn't asking where to take a wounded
bird. He did not ask with whom he might consult should he run across an
ethical or moral dilemma. He was asking how to humanely kill a bird, having
already made the decision on the necessary course of action. David and
others ignored his question and implied that he should not be the person to
make such a decision and that only a bird rehabber or a veterinarian should
make that call. Frankly, I thought those replies were just a little
insulting to the OP though he should expect that sort of reply by asking
such a practical question on the usenet.

My response pointed to the effect of driving a wounded and dying bird four
hours to a vet to have the vet kill the bird. In my mind, the end result is
that the bird would be made to suffer through untold agony for four hours
simply so that David, or whomever assumed the title of chauffeur in that
scenario, could feel generally good about themselves and their "animal
friendly" nature despite the consequences of their action. I have seen that
sentiment expressed to the detriment and further suffering of dying animals
in the past. It has been expressed in this very thread by someone describing
their actions and emotions while watching a bird die in their hands. While
excusable given the inability of many people to end the suffering of an
animal in a quick manner, it probably nevertheless resulted in additional
suffering by the bird, but, and apparently this is the important thing, that
person felt good about it. So you say David would go (or at least write that
he would) out of his way to help an injured animal. When taking the OP's
scenario at face value, I see David's statement as a claim that he would
needlessly prolong the suffering of a dying animal by up to four hours to
make himself feel better about the whole situation.

I suppose my perspective, growing up in a rural area, is far different than
those for whom the death of animals was never something with which they have
been confronted througout their lives. I have hunted and still do on
occasion. I try to kill the animals I hunt as quickly as possible. I eat
meat and wear leather and know that both come from dead animals. If however,
you do not eat or wear animal products and don't eat or use any agricultural
product for which the killing of animals is necessary, you know, those
rarely used commodities like wheat, corn, sugar (yes, the stuff I feed to
hummingbirds is harvested a terrible cost to local rodent families, cane
fields are often burned during or after the harvest, burning alive many
rabbits, voles, rats and mice), cotton, and if you live in a house made of
cinder blocks (because we wouldn't want to patronize those lumber companies
who kill trees and the animals that live in them and feed on them), never
mind the effect of the poisons used to preserve the structural integrity of
the wood used in home building, then I salute you for taking the moral high
ground and not just being a stupid hypocrite.

Eric Miller
 
Eric Miller
Posted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:25 pm
 
Quote:
This problem is caused by a small group of PEOPLE interfering
with nature for their own benefit, and lying to the general public in
order to maintain their fun.

Alright, so answer this question: Why is human predation upon deer an
"interference with nature?" And, more importantly, why is hunting, or
human predation, not "nature?" Assuming that there is nothing inherently
wrong with killing other animals for food (surely you aren't arguing
that point?) isn't it responsible to keep populations high enough to
support the predation?

And to get right down to business, deer are too easy with everyone
having "Bambi" in their childhood memories, are you arguing that it is
morally wrong to kill animals for human benefit? [Presumably to deflect
attention from your boast that you have no problem with subjecting dying
animals to the prolonged suffering of a four hour automobile ride to
their doom followed by your simple, but not unnoticed, complete change
of subject.]

Eric Miller
 
Dave F
Posted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 1:30 am
 
Quote:
OK, Dave. You win.

Mary ann
barnwell, Sc

I'm sorry if scientific fact doesn't support what dear old daddy taught you.

Dave
 
maryann kolb
Posted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 9:42 am
 
On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 00:30:27 -0400, "Dave F" <davegf@home.com> wrote:

Quote:

OK, Dave. You win.

Mary ann
barnwell, Sc

I'm sorry if scientific fact doesn't support what dear old daddy taught you.

Dave


Dave, I'm sorry for being a little flip. I don't hunt. I have never

hunted and I never will. However, I live in the rural South. Here
hunting is a BIG Deal and although I can not imagine actually enjoying
watching or causing something to die I do enjoy the benefits of the
hunt. (I eat the meat.) I spent many of my growing up years on my
Grandparents farm where fresh game and fish made up a large portion of
our diet and where chickens died nearly every day and once a year we
butchered the hogs. I also know where those chunks of meat in the
grocery store come from and how they get there. I have, at times,
seriously thought about giving up eating meat. I think I could live
very happily on beans and rice-----------but I'm just not so sure I
can give up gravy. Sorry.

Mary Ann
Barnwell, SC
 
Eric Miller
Posted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 8:30 pm
 
Dave F wrote:
Quote:
"Eric Miller" <millereric_nospam_@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:I10Rg.8788$zF5.5479@bignews1.bellsouth.net...

This problem is caused by a small group of PEOPLE interfering
with nature for their own benefit, and lying to the general public in
order to maintain their fun.

Alright, so answer this question: Why is human predation upon deer an
"interference with nature?" And, more importantly, why is hunting, or
human predation, not "nature?" Assuming that there is nothing inherently
wrong with killing other animals for food (surely you aren't arguing that
point?) isn't it responsible to keep populations high enough to support
the predation?

And to get right down to business, deer are too easy with everyone having
"Bambi" in their childhood memories, are you arguing that it is morally
wrong to kill animals for human benefit? [Presumably to deflect attention
from your boast that you have no problem with subjecting dying animals to
the prolonged suffering of a four hour automobile ride to their doom
followed by your simple, but not unnoticed, complete change of subject.]

Eric Miller


Take a nap Eric.

Dave



It's OK. I didn't think you would bother replying with anything
intelligible.

Eric Miller
 
Jerry Avins
Posted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 6:27 pm
 
Andy MPLS 44:59:56 N - 93:19:3.018 W wrote:
Quote:
I trap and KILL sparrows. One person in this group suggested thoracic
compressions.
Basically you squeeze them till they slump over. That's kind of creep,
so now I just snap their necks with my thumb and toss them in the
plastic bag.

Before I trapped them, I had nothing but sparrows. Now I have the
nuthatches, goldfinches, cardinals, black cap chickadees, blue jays,
and a couple I haven't figured out yet.

Before you get all sanctimonious, google blue birds, and see how
invasive sparrows are.
It's also not a lost cause because the numbers have definately tapered
off. It's been interesting experiment.

There are many kinds ao sparrows. I hope you can discriminate.

Jerry
--
"The rights of the best of men are secured only as the
rights of the vilest and most abhorrent are protected."
- Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, 1927
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