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fourhmom
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 10:08 am
 
If you're supposed to tie your horse above his withers for safety... why
did they tie all those western movie horses to hitching posts which are
about shoulder level?

I was going to put up a hithing post in my yard and wondered what height
would be best. I was thinking the 'wither' height but then thought of all
the hitching posts I'd seen at old houses and on the movies... hmmmm.

Anyone have any practical experience w/hithing??? sylvia
 
Guest
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 10:08 am
 
On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:08:28 -0500, "fourhmom"
<carl_sylvia_shannon@nunya> wrote:

Quote:
If you're supposed to tie your horse above his withers for safety... why
did they tie all those western movie horses to hitching posts which are
about shoulder level?

No everything you see in Western movies is factual! :-)

Quote:
I was going to put up a hithing post in my yard and wondered what height
would be best. I was thinking the 'wither' height but then thought of all
the hitching posts I'd seen at old houses and on the movies... hmmmm.

Anyone have any practical experience w/hithing??? sylvia

Yup.

Most of our ties are "eye high" but we have used lower ties for
convienience. In a well broke horse they are not a problem. If you
have a poorly broke animal then you might. The answer, of course, is
to get the horse well broke.

The best "hitching rails" I ever saw were at a place in FL. They were
6" or 8" PVC pipe, set a bit above human waist-level high, filled with
re-bar reinforced concrete (upright and cross member). Heavy duty
eye-bolts were placed in holes drilled in the PVC and set while the
concrete was wet. Short lengths of heavy nylon rope were attached to
the eye-bolts with a heavy duty snap on each end. You could also tie
a lead rope to the cross member. The uprights were also set in
concrete.

They also had some straight and cross ties built in the same fashion.

While these "hitching rails" were lower than ideal, they had no sharp
edges and were not going to break for anything short of an elephant!

Bill Kambic
 
John Hasler
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 3:08 pm
 
Bill Kambic writes:
Quote:
Ever watch any of the Wild West Tech series on the History Channel?

I've never watched anything on the History Channel. Couldn't if I wanted
to.
--
John Hasler Boarding, Lessons, Training
john@dhh.gt.org Hay, Jumps, Cavallox
Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, WI USA
 
Beverly Wheeler
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 7:28 pm
 
Quote:
what you've seen on TV? Yes, I'm a bit incredulous.

There actually are people who consider TV a reliable source of
information.
Amazing, isn't it?
--
John Hasler Boarding, Lessons, Training

You can add me to that list of people. I thought those hitching rails on TV
were similar to what was actually used in the "Wild West". How were the
original hitching rails different?

Beverly
 
John Hasler
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 8:08 pm
 
Beverly writes:
Quote:
You can add me to that list of people. I thought those hitching rails on
TV were similar to what was actually used in the "Wild West". How were
the original hitching rails different?

Most likely, they were even lower and more rickety.

Or are you also one of those who believes that they did things right in the
old days?
--
John Hasler Boarding, Lessons, Training
john@dhh.gt.org Hay, Jumps, Cavallox
Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, WI USA
 
Jim Casey
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 10:08 pm
 
fourhmom wrote:
Quote:
If you're supposed to tie your horse above his withers for safety... why
did they tie all those western movie horses to hitching posts which are
about shoulder level?

I boarded for years at a place that had hitching posts at my waist
level, which is <fetching measuring tape> three and a half feet.

This height is fairly convenient for putting the saddle on the hitching
post and transferring it to the horse's back.

A broke horse will stand tied to a cinder block on the ground or a
half-inch dowel rod. The advice about tying high and short usually
precedes an explanation of how to train a green horse to do something,
where the greenie may pull back.

- Jim
 
John Hasler
Posted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 11:56 pm
 
Jim writes:
Quote:
A broke horse will stand tied to a cinder block on the ground or a
half-inch dowel rod. The advice about tying high and short usually
precedes an explanation of how to train a green horse to do something,
where the greenie may pull back.

With sufficient provocation your "broke" horse will pull back as well.
Then he will go galloping down the road towing your cinder block,
endangering the public and injuring himself.
--
John Hasler Boarding, Lessons, Training
john@dhh.gt.org Hay, Jumps, Cavallox
Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, WI USA
 
fourhmom
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 12:08 am
 
Thanks Jim and Bill. :)

I've seen a few actual hitching rails and they were about waist high...
But were they the ORIGINAL hitching rails??? Who knows?

Yes, I would be using it for horses. I need something better than my
porch and a few trees. Smile I also would like to be able to have people
'hitch' the horse safely who didn't necessarily know how to tie a panic
knot or to tie to a tree tightly enough for the rope not to end up at the
horse's feet.

I tie mine high but not tight - I like for them to be able to 'blow their
nose' so to speak but not reach down and graze.

Hadn't thought of using it to hold saddles - I was planning on making
separate saddle rack thingys but using the same rail would make alot of
sense, wouldn't it?? Duh... :)

I like the wood idea (as opposed to the pvc pipe) simply because three
times around a wood rail would pretty much keep them there, I think the
rope would slip off pvc.

Anything likely to pull my rails up out of the ground would NOT be tied to
them!!! Going about 3 feet deep and setting in concrete was what I'd
figured on. Most likely using 4x4's or 6x6's w/round fence posts as the
rail.

Thanks for the info but I do have one more question. Someone said,
"google this group"... what in the world does that mean? The only
"google-ing" I do is google.com and then type in my search. Is what she
was speaking of different? sylvia

PS I don't have the correct software -- I'm looking at ya'll through
Talkaboutpets.com.
 
Karen
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 12:08 am
 
Ive always heard that a hitching post should be "wither high"...and Ive
always wondered.....the withers on which horse???? Ive got horses ranging in
size from 14 hands to 17.....big difference in wither height.

Just an observation
 
Priscilla Dance
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 2:07 am
 
Tom Bloomer, CF wrote:
Quote:



I must be screwing up. All of my horses were taught to ground tie before
they ever had a saddle on their back. Most of the business establishments
around here have waist high hitching posts in the parking lots - for the
Amish to tie up their buggy horses. Been living in these parts for about 10
years and have yet to see or hear of any problem with one of them Amish
horses pulling loose or getting tangled and damaged. Of course, the Amish
treat their horses as live stock and transportation - they don't have much
use for the partnership philosophy - the Amish aren't very romantic.


Tying high and short is because some dumb horse is apt to put his foot
over the rope and (you can fill in the blank).

I was at a barn where someone tied an Arabian long, horse bent down to
eat grass, banged its head on the hitching post when it picked it up and
--in the ensuing panic -- broke its neck.

I would think waist-high would be okay as long as you tied the horse short.

Priscilla Dance
 
Tom Bloomer, CF
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 2:07 am
 
"Jim Casey" <seamus@compuserve.com> wrote in message
news:10uebliq3ptc4fb@corp.supernews.com...
Quote:
fourhmom wrote:
If you're supposed to tie your horse above his withers for safety... why
did they tie all those western movie horses to hitching posts which are
about shoulder level?

I boarded for years at a place that had hitching posts at my waist
level, which is <fetching measuring tape> three and a half feet.

This height is fairly convenient for putting the saddle on the hitching
post and transferring it to the horse's back.

A broke horse will stand tied to a cinder block on the ground or a
half-inch dowel rod. The advice about tying high and short usually
precedes an explanation of how to train a green horse to do something,
where the greenie may pull back.

- Jim


I must be screwing up. All of my horses were taught to ground tie before
they ever had a saddle on their back. Most of the business establishments
around here have waist high hitching posts in the parking lots - for the
Amish to tie up their buggy horses. Been living in these parts for about 10
years and have yet to see or hear of any problem with one of them Amish
horses pulling loose or getting tangled and damaged. Of course, the Amish
treat their horses as live stock and transportation - they don't have much
use for the partnership philosophy - the Amish aren't very romantic.

--
Tom Bloomer, CF
 
Jim Casey
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:50 am
 
John Hasler wrote:

Quote:
With sufficient provocation your "broke" horse will pull back as well.
Then he will go galloping down the road towing your cinder block,
endangering the public and injuring himself.

Nah, I figured out the rules of this game: If a horse doesn't perform
whatever chore or unlikely trick you've described, he's not broke or not a
"good horse."

Seriously, I don't tie to anything less than 4x4, preferably 6x6.

- Jim
 
Jim Casey
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:59 am
 
fourhmom wrote:
Quote:
... Someone said,
"google this group"... what in the world does that mean?

Go to http://groups-beta.google.com/advanced_search. Where it says,
"Return message only from the group," enter rec.equestrian.

This URL will probably change. In general, go to www.google.com and look
for "Groups."

- Jim
 
Emily Brooks
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 9:09 am
 
"fourhmom" <carl_sylvia_shannon@nunya> wrote in message
news:e571d6a39d7ecbbc7b5361dd56199600@localhost.talkaboutpets.com...
Quote:

PS I don't have the correct software -- I'm looking at ya'll through
Talkaboutpets.com.


There are folks here who can point you to decent newsreaders, some of them
with free services. Unfortunately, I'm not one of them and can never seem to
get the names right when people need to know.

Emily (I know, pretty useless as posts go)
 
Mary McHugh
Posted: Fri Jan 14, 2005 9:10 am
 
fourhmom wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for the info but I do have one more question. Someone said,
"google this group"... what in the world does that mean? The only
"google-ing" I do is google.com and then type in my search. Is what she
was speaking of different? sylvia

USENET posts, for the most part, are archived now by Google. So pretty
much everything that's been posted in this group rec.equestrian is
available for searching through Goggle's interface. That's the "Groups"
option above the spot where you type in what you're searching for.
Click on Groups, then Advanced Search. Type in hitching post
construction or something like that in the first field and make sure you
set group to search to rec.equestrian. A great many of the questions
asked here have been asked and answered time and time again. It's
courtesy to google the group for the answer first before asking a question.

Here's the URL to a thread in 2000 where hitching post construction was
discussed:
<http://groups-beta.google.com/group/rec.equestrian/browse_thread/thread/8d039c12aa5f9c4a/a8804dbadb554844?q=hitching+post+build+group:rec.equestrian&_done=%2Fgroups%3Fas_q%3Dhitching+post+build%26num%3D100%26scoring%3Dd%26hl%3Den%26ie%3DUTF-8%26as_epq%3D%26as_oq%3D%26as_eq%3D%26as_ugroup%3Drec.equestrian%26as_usubject%3D%26as_uauthors%3D%26lr%3D%26as_drrb%3Dq%26as_qdr%3D%26as_mind%3D1%26as_minm%3D1%26as_miny%3D1981%26as_maxd%3D14%26as_maxm%3D1%26as_maxy%3D2005%26safe%3Doff%26&_doneTitle=Back+to+Search&&d#a8804dbadb554844>

If your microsoft product splits the line above, you'll have to use this
tiny url:

<http://tinyurl.com/3oapb>

I put "hitching post build" in the 'with all the words' field and I put
"rec.equestrian" in the Group field (return only messages from group...).

Quote:
PS I don't have the correct software -- I'm looking at ya'll through
Talkaboutpets.com.

What software? You only need a web browser to google, which is how I
assume you're accessing the above mentioned site.

Mary
 
 
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